IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/fip/fednls/87178.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

A Close Look at the Decline of Homeownership

Author

Listed:
  • Andrew F. Haughwout
  • Richard Peach
  • Joseph Tracy

Abstract

The homeownership rate?the percentage of households that own rather than rent the homes that they live in?has fallen sharply since mid-2005. In fact, in the second quarter of 2016 the homeownership rate fell to 62.9 percent, its lowest level since 1965. In this blog post, we look at underlying demographic trends to gain a deeper understanding of the large increase in the homeownership rate from 1995 to 2005 and the subsequent large decline. Although there is reason to believe that the homeownership rate may begin to rise again in the not-too-distant future, it is unlikely to fully recover to its previous peak levels. This is a disconcerting finding for those who view homeownership as an integral part of the American Dream and a key component of income security during retirement.

Suggested Citation

  • Andrew F. Haughwout & Richard Peach & Joseph Tracy, 2017. "A Close Look at the Decline of Homeownership," Liberty Street Economics 20170217, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fednls:87178
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://libertystreeteconomics.newyorkfed.org/2017/02/a-close-look-at-the-decline-of-homeownership.html
    Download Restriction: no

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Nicholas Fritsch & Rawley Heimer, 2020. "Intergenerational Homeownership and Mortgage Distress," Economic Commentary, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, vol. 2020(12), pages 1-7, June.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Headship Rate; age-specific population growth; Homeownership Rate;

    JEL classification:

    • R3 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Real Estate Markets, Spatial Production Analysis, and Firm Location

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:fip:fednls:87178. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/frbnyus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.