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Divestiture as an antitrust remedy in bank mergers


  • Jim Burke


The purpose of this study is to determine whether, from a public policy standpoint, divestitures constitute an effective antitrust remedy in bank merger cases. A number of findings emerge from the study: Divested branches have a remarkable survival record; structural changes effected by divestitures tend to persist over time; larger buyers of divested branches tended to be more successful than smaller buyers; divestiture of the target institutions' branches rather than those of applicants proved preferable from an antitrust standpoint; and divested branches selected by the Department of Justice do not perform better than others. The findings suggest that divestitures of bank offices have generally provided an effective public policy remedy

Suggested Citation

  • Jim Burke, 1998. "Divestiture as an antitrust remedy in bank mergers," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 1998-14, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedgfe:1998-14

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Gilchrist, Simon & Himmelberg, Charles P., 1995. "Evidence on the role of cash flow for investment," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(3), pages 541-572, December.
    2. Myers, Stewart C. & Majluf, Nicolás S., 1945-, 1984. "Corporate financing and investment decisions when firms have information that investors do not have," Working papers 1523-84., Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Sloan School of Management.
    3. Myers, Stewart C. & Majluf, Nicholas S., 1984. "Corporate financing and investment decisions when firms have information that investors do not have," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(2), pages 187-221, June.
    4. Whited, Toni M, 1992. " Debt, Liquidity Constraints, and Corporate Investment: Evidence from Panel Data," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 47(4), pages 1425-1460, September.
    5. Takeo Hoshi & Anil Kashyap & David Scharfstein, 1991. "Corporate Structure, Liquidity, and Investment: Evidence from Japanese Industrial Groups," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 106(1), pages 33-60.
    6. Barr, David G & Cuthbertson, Keith, 1992. "Company Sector Liquid Asset Holdings: A Systems Approach," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 24(1), pages 83-97, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. Steven J. Pilloff, 2002. "What's happened at divested bank offices? An empirical analysis of antitrust divestitures in bank mergers," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2002-60, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    2. Elizabeth K. Kiser, 2002. "Household switching behavior at depository institutions: evidence from survey data," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2002-44, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    3. Kwast, Myron L., 1999. "Bank mergers: What should policymakers do?," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 23(2-4), pages 629-636, February.

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    Antitrust law ; Bank mergers;


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