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Measurement of Intangible Investments by Industry and Its Role in Productivity Improvement Utilizing Comparative Studies between Japan and Korea


  • Hyunbae CHUN
  • FUKAO Kyoji
  • HISA Shoichi
  • MIYAGAWA Tsutomu


Using the Japan Industrial Productivity (JIP) database and other primary statistics, we estimate intangible investments in Japan at the industry level. Comparing our estimates with Korean ones measured by Professor Chun, intangible investment/gross value added (GVA) ratios in Japan are higher than those in Korea in many industries. However, in some service industries, Korean intangible investments are larger than their Japanese counterparts. Although intangible capital stock in 2008 was 136 trillion yen, the growth rate in intangibles became negative in some industries in Japan in the 2000s due to harsh restructuring. When we examine the impacts of intangible investments on total factor productivity (TFP) growth, we find a significant and positive effect on it in the market economy after the IT revolution. However, in the service sector, we do not find any clear evidence of the effect of intangibles. The estimation results show that the government should improve its management skills to utilize intangible assets effectively through deregulation in the service sector.

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  • Hyunbae CHUN & FUKAO Kyoji & HISA Shoichi & MIYAGAWA Tsutomu, 2012. "Measurement of Intangible Investments by Industry and Its Role in Productivity Improvement Utilizing Comparative Studies between Japan and Korea," Discussion papers 12037, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
  • Handle: RePEc:eti:dpaper:12037

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    Cited by:

    1. MIYAGAWA Tsutomu & Keun LEE & EDAMURA Kazuma & YoungGak KIM & Hosung JUNG, 2014. "Is Productivity Growth Correlated with Improvements in Management Quality? An empirical study using interview surveys in Korea and Japan," Discussion papers 14048, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
    2. repec:bla:revinw:v:63:y:2017:i::p:s49-s67 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Kyoji Fukao, 2013. "Explaining Japan's Unproductive Two Decades," Asian Economic Policy Review, Japan Center for Economic Research, vol. 8(2), pages 193-213, December.
    4. MORIKAWA Masayuki, 2012. "Financial Constraints in Intangible Investments: Evidence from Japanese firms," Discussion papers 12045, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
    5. Tsutomu Miyagawa & Shoichi Hisa, 2013. "Measurement of Intangible Investment by Industry and Economic Growth in Japan," Public Policy Review, Policy Research Institute, Ministry of Finance Japan, vol. 9(2), pages 405-432, March.
    6. Hyunbae Chun & M. Ishaq Nadiri, 2016. "Intangible Investment and Changing Sources of Growth in Korea," The Japanese Economic Review, Japanese Economic Association, vol. 67(1), pages 50-76, March.
    7. Kevin J. Fox & Thomas Niebel & Mary O'Mahony & Marianne Saam, 2017. "The Contribution of Intangible Assets to Sectoral Productivity Growth in the EU," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 63, pages 49-67, February.
    8. Hyunbae CHUN & MIYAGAWA Tsutomu & Hak Kil PYO & TONOGI Konomi, 2015. "Do Intangibles Contribute to Productivity Growth in East Asian Countries? Evidence from Japan and Korea," Discussion papers 15055, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
    9. Crass, Dirk & Licht, Georg & Peters, Bettina, 2014. "Intangible assets and investments at the sector level: Empirical evidence for Germany," ZEW Discussion Papers 14-049, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.

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