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Scrapping subsidies during the financial crisis - Evidence from the Europe

  • Nina LEHEYDA
  • Frank VERBOVEN

We study the effects of the car scrapping subsidies in Europe during the financial crisis. We make use of a rich data set of all car models sold in nine European countries, observed at a monthly level during 2005-2011.We employ a difference-in-differences approach, exploiting the fact that different countries adopted their programs at different points in time. We find that the scrapping schemes played a strong role in stabilizing total car sales in 2009: they prevented a total car sales reduction of 17.4% in countries with schemes targeted to low emission vehicles, and they prevented a 14.8% sales reduction in countries with non-targeted schemes. In contrast, the scrapping schemes only had small environmental benefits: without the schemes, average fuel consumption of new purchased cars would have been only 1.3% higher in countries with targeted schemes and 0.5% higher in countries with non-targeted schemes. We do not find evidence of crowding out due to substitution from non-eligible to eligible cars in countries with targeted schemes. Finally, we identify some competitive and trade effects from the schemes: domestic car producers benefited at the expense of foreign competitors in the countries where the schemes were not targeted.

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Paper provided by Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Centrum voor Economische Studiën in its series Center for Economic Studies - Discussion papers with number ces13.13.

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Date of creation: Aug 2013
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ete:ceswps:ces13.13
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  1. Pasquale Schiraldi, 2010. "Automobile Replacement: A DynamicStructural Approach," STICERD - Economics of Industry Papers 49, Suntory and Toyota International Centres for Economics and Related Disciplines, LSE.
  2. Jerome Adda & Russell Cooper, 1997. "Balladurette and Juppette: A Discrete Analysis of Scrapping Subsidies," Papers 0076, Boston University - Industry Studies Programme.
  3. Meghan Busse & Jorge Silva-Risso & Florian Zettelmeyer, 2006. "$1,000 Cash Back: The Pass-Through of Auto Manufacturer Promotions," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 96(4), pages 1253-1270, September.
  4. Marianne Bertrand & Esther Duflo & Sendhil Mullainathan, 2002. "How Much Should We Trust Differences-in-Differences Estimates?," NBER Working Papers 8841, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Adam Copeland & James Kahn, 2011. "The production impact of "cash-for-clunkers": implications for stabilization policy," Staff Reports 503, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
  6. Orley C. Ashenfelter & Daniel Hosken & Matthew Weinberg, 2009. "Generating Evidence to Guide Merger Enforcement," NBER Working Papers 14798, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Omar Licandro & Antonio R. Sampayo, 2005. "The effects of replacement schemes on car sales: the Spanish case," Economics Working Papers ECO2005/20, European University Institute.
  8. Grigolon, Laura & Leheyda, Nina & Verboven, Frank, 2012. "Public support for the European car industry: An integrated analysis," ZEW Discussion Papers 12-077, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
  9. Esteban Susanna, 2007. "Effective Scrappage Subsidies," The B.E. Journal of Theoretical Economics, De Gruyter, vol. 7(1), pages 1-32, February.
  10. Sriram Venkataraman & Gregor Matvos & Chad Syverson & Business & Business & Ali Hortacsu, 2010. "Are Consumers Affected by Durable Goods Makers’ Financial Distress? The Case of Auto Manufacturers," 2010 Meeting Papers 836, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  11. Matthew C. Weinberg, 2011. "More Evidence on the Performance of Merger Simulations," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(3), pages 51-55, May.
  12. Robert W. Hahn, 1995. "An Economic Analysis of Scrappage," RAND Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 26(2), pages 222-242, Summer.
  13. Li, Shanjun & Linn, Joshua & Spiller, Elisheba, 2013. "Evaluating “Cash-for-Clunkers”: Program effects on auto sales and the environment," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 65(2), pages 175-193.
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