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Crop Insurance in India


  • Gurdev Singh


This working paper discusses the dependence of Indian agriculture on uncertain rains. In addition the farmers experience other production risks as well as marketing risks related to different crop enterprises and for different agro-climatic regions and areas. It then argues on the need for crop insurance as an alternative to manage production risk. It then takes up the historical overview of crop insurance products and their performance. It is followed by the discussion on the currently available crop insurance products for specific crops and regions. It discusses at length the two important products, namely, National Agricultural Insurance Scheme and Weather Based Insurance Scheme. It also reflects on some deficiencies in these products. [W.P. No. 2010-06-01

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  • Gurdev Singh, 2010. "Crop Insurance in India," Working Papers id:2631, eSocialSciences.
  • Handle: RePEc:ess:wpaper:id:2631
    Note: Institutional Papers

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Thiagu Ranganathan & Usha Ananthakumar, 2017. "Hedging in Presence of Crop Yield, Crop Revenue and Rainfall Insurance," Journal of Quantitative Economics, Springer;The Indian Econometric Society (TIES), vol. 15(1), pages 151-171, March.

    More about this item


    Indian agriculture; uncertain rains; crop enterprises; crop insurance; agro-climatic regions; performance; National Agricultural Insurance Scheme; Weather Based Insurance Scheme;

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