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An experimental analysis of the impact of survey design on measures and models of subjective wellbeing

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  • Pudney, Stephen

Abstract

We analyse the results of experiments on aspects of the design of questionnaire and interview mode in the 2009 wave of the new UK Understanding Society panel survey. The randomised experiments relate to job- and life-satisfaction questions and vary the labeling of response scales, the mode of interviewing and the location of questions within the interview. We find a highly significant impact of these design features on the distributions of reported satisfaction in various life domains and some important impacts on the findings from conventional cross-section models of satisfaction.

Suggested Citation

  • Pudney, Stephen, 2010. "An experimental analysis of the impact of survey design on measures and models of subjective wellbeing," ISER Working Paper Series 2010-20, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:ese:iserwp:2010-20
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Krueger, Alan B. & Schkade, David A., 2008. "The reliability of subjective well-being measures," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 92(8-9), pages 1833-1845, August.
    2. Andrew E. Clark & Paul Frijters & Michael A. Shields, 2008. "Relative Income, Happiness, and Utility: An Explanation for the Easterlin Paradox and Other Puzzles," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 46(1), pages 95-144, March.
    3. Gabriella Conti & Stephen Pudney, 2011. "Survey Design and the Analysis of Satisfaction," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 93(3), pages 1087-1093, August.
    4. Nicolai Kristensen & Niels Westergaard-Nielsen, 2007. "Reliability of job satisfaction measures," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 8(2), pages 273-292, June.
    5. Andrew E. Clark & Paul Frijters & Michael A. Shields, 2008. "Relative Income, Happiness, and Utility: An Explanation for the Easterlin Paradox and Other Puzzles," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 46(1), pages 95-144, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Lucy Tinkler, 2015. "The Office for National Statistics Experience of Collecting and Measuring Subjective Well-Being," Statistics in Transition new series, Główny Urząd Statystyczny (Polska), vol. 16(3), pages 373-396, September.
    2. Lucy Tinkler, 2015. "The Office For National Statistics Experience Of Collecting And Measuring Subjective Well-Being," Statistics in Transition New Series, Polish Statistical Association, vol. 16(3), pages 373-396, September.
    3. Luthra, Renee Reichl & Platt, Lucinda & Salamonska, Justyna, 2014. "Migrant diversity, migration motivations and early integration: the case of Poles in Germany, the Netherlands, London and Dublin," ISER Working Paper Series 2014-18, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    4. Renee Luthra & Lucinda Platt & Justyna Salamonska, 2014. "Migrant diversity, migration motivations and early integration: the case of Poles in Germany, the Netherlands, London and Dublin," Europe in Question Discussion Paper Series of the London School of Economics (LEQs) 4, London School of Economics / European Institute.
    5. Renee Luthra & Lucinda Platt & Justyna Salamońska, 2014. "Migrant diversity, migration motivations and early integration: the case of Poles in Germany, the Netherlands, London and Dublin," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1412, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
    6. Burton, Jonathan & Laurie, Heather & Uhrig, S.C. Noah, 2010. "Understanding Society Innovation Panel Wave 2: results from methodological experiments," Understanding Society Working Paper Series 2010-04, Understanding Society at the Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    7. Renee Luthra & Lucinda Platt & Justyna Salamonska, 2014. "Migrant diversity, migration motivations and early integration: the case of Poles in Germany, the Netherlands, London and Dublin," LEQS – LSE 'Europe in Question' Discussion Paper Series 74, European Institute, LSE.
    8. Luisa Corrado & Majlinda Joxhe, 2016. "The Effect of Survey Design on Extreme Response Style: Rating Job Satisfaction," CEIS Research Paper 365, Tor Vergata University, CEIS, revised 08 Feb 2016.
    9. Luthra, Renee & Platt, Lucinda & Salamońska, Justyna, 2014. "Migrant diversity, migration motivations and early integration: the case of Poles in Germany, the Netherlands, London and Dublin," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 57605, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

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