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The Value of Human and Social Capital Investments for the Business Performance of Startups

  • Gerrit de Wit
  • Niels Bosma
  • Roy Thurik
  • Mirjam van Praag

We investigated the manifold posed question: To what extent does investment in human and social capital, besides the effect of 'talent', enhance entrepreneurial performance?. We distinguished between three different performance measures: survival, profits, and generated employment. On the basis of the empirical analysis of a rich Dutch longitudinal data set of firm founders, we concluded that specific investments indeed affect the three performance measures substantially and significantly. Specific attention is paid to the unobserved talent bias. Moreover, the effect of the emergence of so-called 'knowledge industries' is explored.

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Paper provided by EIM Business and Policy Research in its series Scales Research Reports with number N200204.

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Length: 20 pages
Date of creation: 01 Jul 2002
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:eim:papers:n200204
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  1. Orley Ashenfelter & Colm Harmon & Hessel Oosterbeek, 1999. "A Review of Estimates of the Schooling/Earnings Relationship, with Tests for Publication Bias," Working Papers 804, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
  2. De Wit, Gerrit & Van Winden, Frans A. A. M., 1990. "An empirical analysis of self-employment in the Netherlands," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 97-100, January.
  3. David B. Audretsch & A. Roy Thurik, 2000. "Capitalism and democracy in the 21st Century: from the managed to the entrepreneurial economy," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 10(1), pages 17-34.
  4. Lancaster,Tony, 1992. "The Econometric Analysis of Transition Data," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521437899, October.
  5. van Praag, C M & Cramer, J S, 2001. "The Roots of Entrepreneurship and Labour Demand: Individual Ability and Low Risk Aversion," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 68(269), pages 45-62, February.
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