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Patterns of industrial specialisation in post-unification Italy

Author

Listed:
  • Carlo Ciccarelli

    (University of Rome 'Tor Vergata')

  • Tommaso Proietti

    (University of Rome 'Tor Vergata')

Abstract

"This paper investigates the patterns of sectoral specialisation in Italian provinces over half a century following the Unification of the country. To this end we propose a multivariate graphical technique named dynamic spe- cialisation biplots. In 1871 specialisation vocations toward the different manufacturing sectors were limited in size and no clear geographical path emerged. A regional specialisation divide resulted clearly in 1911. In 1871 as in 1911 the foodstuffs, the textile, and the engineering sectors represented the three pillars delimiting the arena of the specialisation race. Within that arena, sharp changes in the directions of specialisation trajectories charac- terise a group of selected Northern provinces, largely attracted by the tex- tile sector from the 1880s and from the engineering sector in the pre-War decade. Within region homogeneity and smooth specialisation trajectories are instead representative of most of the remaining provinces. Among them, Southern provinces exhibit specialisation paths revealing that little more than a composition effect occurred among manufacturing sectors."

Suggested Citation

  • Carlo Ciccarelli & Tommaso Proietti, 2011. "Patterns of industrial specialisation in post-unification Italy," Working Papers 11010, Economic History Society.
  • Handle: RePEc:ehs:wpaper:11010
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Carlo Ciccarelli & Stefano Fenoaltea, 2009. "Shipbuilding in Italy, 1861-1913: the burden of the evidence," Historical Social Research (Section 'Cliometrics'), Association Française de Cliométrie (AFC), vol. 34(2), pages 333-373.
    2. Zamagni, Vera, 1997. "The Economic History of Italy 1860-1990," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198292890.
    3. Fenoaltea,Stefano, 2014. "The Reinterpretation of Italian Economic History," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9781107658080, July.
    4. Fenoaltea, Stefano, 2003. "Notes on the Rate of Industrial Growth in Italy, 1861–1913," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 63(3), pages 695-735, September.
    5. Carlo Ciccarelli & Stefano Fenoaltea, 2013. "Through the magnifying glass: provincial aspects of industrial growth in post-Unification Italy," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 66(1), pages 57-85, February.
    6. Fenoaltea, Stefano, 2003. "Peeking Backward: Regional Aspects of Industrial Growth in Post-Unification Italy," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 63(4), pages 1059-1102, December.
    7. Ciccarelli, Carlo & Fenoaltea, Stefano, 2007. "Business fluctuations in Italy, 1861-1913: The new evidence," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 44(3), pages 432-451, July.
    8. Greenacre Michael, 2010. "Biplots in Practice," Books, Fundacion BBVA / BBVA Foundation, number 2011113, December.
    9. Fenoaltea, Stefano, 1988. "International resource flows and construction movements in the atlantic economy: the kuznets cycle in Italy, 1861–1913," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 48(3), pages 605-637, September.
    10. Carlo Ciccarelli & Stefano Fenoaltea, 2008. "The Chemicals, Coal and Petroleum Products, and Rubber Industries in Italy's Regions, 1861-1913: Time-Series Estimates," Rivista di storia economica, Società editrice il Mulino, issue 1, pages 3-58.
    11. Stefano Fenoaltea, 2004. "Textile production in Italy's regions, 1861-1913," Rivista di storia economica, Società editrice il Mulino, issue 2, pages 145-174.
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    Cited by:

    1. Alessandro Nuvolari & Michelangelo Vasta, 2017. "The geography of innovation in Italy, 1861–1913: evidence from patent data," European Review of Economic History, Oxford University Press, vol. 21(3), pages 326-356.
    2. Carlo Ciccarelli & Stefano Fachin, 2017. "Regional growth with spatial dependence: A case study on early Italian industrialization," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 96(4), pages 675-695, November.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    manufacturing industry; specialisation; post-Unification Italy;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • N00 - Economic History - - General - - - General

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