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Price hike of staple food, nutritional impact and consumption adjustment: Evidence from the 2005-2010 rice price increase in rural Bangladesh

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  • Syed Abul Hasan

Abstract

This paper studies the nutritional impact and the adjustment in consumption as a result of the 2005-2010 rice price increase in rural Bangladesh. We compare the net rice buyers, who suffer from a negative income effect, with the self sufficient households. Our findings indicate that rural households in Bangladesh cope well with the surge in the domestic rice price as indicated by the absence of any effect on their calorie intake and food diversity. Income plays a crucial role in dietary diversity indicating the importance of effective income support programmes at the time of food price shocks.

Suggested Citation

  • Syed Abul Hasan, 2017. "Price hike of staple food, nutritional impact and consumption adjustment: Evidence from the 2005-2010 rice price increase in rural Bangladesh," Crawford School Research Papers 1702, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
  • Handle: RePEc:een:crwfrp:1702
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    File URL: https://crawford.anu.edu.au/sites/default/files/publication/crawford01_cap_anu_edu_au/2017-02/cswp1702.pdf
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    Cited by:

    1. Syed Hasan & Nazmun Ratna & Shamim Shakur, 2019. "Exchange rate, remittances and expenditure of foreign-bornhouseholds: evidence from Australia," Discussion Papers 1901, School of Economics and Finance, Massey University, New Zealand.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Rice Price Increase; Difference-in-difference Estimation; Nutrition; Bangladesh;

    JEL classification:

    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products
    • O53 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Asia including Middle East
    • Q12 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Micro Analysis of Farm Firms, Farm Households, and Farm Input Markets

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