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facing gender inequality: A close look at the European Strategy for Social Protection and Social Inclusion and its Gender Equality Challenges after 2010

Author

Listed:
  • Marcella Corsi
  • Chiara Crepaldi
  • Manuela Samek Lodovici

Abstract

The aim of this paper is to sum up the main issues at stake in the European Union, concerning gender equality in social inclusion and social protection policies. As is well known “Equality between women and men” is one of the founding principles of the Treaty of the European Union. However, despite progress made over past decades, gender inequalities are still persistent in a number of spheres. Poverty is increasingly feminised and especially affects single mothers and elderly women. Gender inequalities, however, are also persistent among other groups facing social exclusion, for example immigrants, ethnic minorities and the disabled. This means that there are differences in the causes, extent, and form of social exclusion experienced by women and men. The paper, introduced by an overview of primary gender gaps, focuses on specific issues in the three policy areas where the promotion of gender equality would be particularly important: social inclusion, pensions, health and long-term care. Special attention is devoted to empowerment policies, integrating several welfare domains and distinctive approaches.

Suggested Citation

  • Marcella Corsi & Chiara Crepaldi & Manuela Samek Lodovici, 2010. "facing gender inequality: A close look at the European Strategy for Social Protection and Social Inclusion and its Gender Equality Challenges after 2010," DULBEA Working Papers 10-04.RS, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
  • Handle: RePEc:dul:wpaper:10-04rs
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Gender Inequality; Social Inclusion; Pensions; Health and Long-term Care;

    JEL classification:

    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty
    • I38 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Government Programs; Provision and Effects of Welfare Programs
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination

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