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Think Before You Tweet: Social Media Best Practices for Undergraduate Business Schools

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  • Donna I. M. Spraggon

    () (Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics, University of Massachusetts Amherst)

Abstract

There are more than 100 social media tools available to higher education institutions to reach potential, current and past students. Both students and institutions are making use of social media, however, the latter are typically not taking full advantage of what is available. In this paper, I explore best practices in social media as they pertain to undergraduate business schools. An examination of 20 business schools reveals a large disconnect between social media best practice theory and those practices observed. Building on the identified best practices, I have constructed a suggested model for social media for a business school undergraduate program aimed at recruitment, retention and alumni investment.

Suggested Citation

  • Donna I. M. Spraggon, 2011. "Think Before You Tweet: Social Media Best Practices for Undergraduate Business Schools," Working Papers 2011-1, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Department of Resource Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:dre:wpaper:2011-1
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    File URL: http://courses.umass.edu/resec/workingpapers/documents/ResEcWorkingPaper2011-1.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    advising; business school; recruitment; retention; social media;

    JEL classification:

    • M00 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - General - - - General
    • A20 - General Economics and Teaching - - Economic Education and Teaching of Economics - - - General

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