IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this paper

El Impacto de un Programa Social sobre la Informalidad Laboral: El Caso de la AUH en Argentina


  • Santiago Garganta


  • Leonardo Gasparini



El programa de Asignación Universal por Hijo en Argentina extiende a los desocupados y trabajadores informales un beneficio antes limitado a los empleados formales. Esta extensión podría modificar los incentivos laborales, estimulando una menor participación en el sector formal respecto de la que hubiese surgido en ausencia del programa. En este trabajo estimamos ese efecto comparando en el tiempo al grupo de hogares elegibles (informales, con hijos), con un grupo semejante pero no elegible (sin hijos). Los resultados sugieren un significativo desincentivo hacia la formalización de los beneficiarios, pero no hay evidencia de un incentivo hacia la informalidad de los trabajadores registrados.

Suggested Citation

  • Santiago Garganta & Leonardo Gasparini, 2012. "El Impacto de un Programa Social sobre la Informalidad Laboral: El Caso de la AUH en Argentina," CEDLAS, Working Papers 0133, CEDLAS, Universidad Nacional de La Plata.
  • Handle: RePEc:dls:wpaper:0133

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. David G. Blanchflower & Andrew J. Oswald, 1995. "The Wage Curve," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 026202375x, July.
    2. World Bank, 2006. "Tracking Basic Education Expenditure in Yemen : Analyses of Public Resource Management and Teacher Absenteeism," World Bank Other Operational Studies 8156, The World Bank.
    3. International Monetary Fund, 2009. "Analyzing Fiscal Space Using the MAMS Model - An Application to Burkina Faso," IMF Working Papers 09/227, International Monetary Fund.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. repec:ilo:ilowps:484590 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Branko Milanovic & Sean Higgins & Nora Lustig & Whitney Ruble & Timothy M. Smeeding, 2016. "Comparing the Incidence of Taxes and Social Spending in Brazil and the United States," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 62, pages 22-46, August.
    3. Sean Higgins & Nora Lustig & Whitney Ruble & Timothy Smeeding, 2013. "Comparing the incidence of taxes and social spending in Brazil and the United States," Commitment to Equity (CEQ) Working Paper Series 1316, Tulane University, Department of Economics.
    4. Bertranou, Fabio M. & Casanova, Luis. & Sarabia, Marianela., 2013. "Dónde, cómo y por qué se redujo la informalidad laboral en Argentina durante el período 2003-2012," ILO Working Papers 994845903402676, International Labour Organization.
    5. Santiago Levy & Norbert Schady, 2013. "Latin America's Social Policy Challenge: Education, Social Insurance, Redistribution," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 27(2), pages 193-218, Spring.
    6. D Elia, Vanesa, 2015. "Programas sociales en Argentina y bienestar: Impacto de la moratoria previsional y de la AUH
      [Social Programs in Argentina and Welfare: The impact of pension moratorium and the AUH]
      ," MPRA Paper 63980, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Sean Higgins, Nora Lustig, Whitney Ruble, and Timothy Smeeding, 2014. "Comparing the Incidence of Taxes and Social Spending in Brazil and the United States - Working Paper 360," Working Papers 360, Center for Global Development.
    8. Nicolás Badaracco, 2014. "Fecundidad y Cambios Distributivos en América Latina," CEDLAS, Working Papers 0173, CEDLAS, Universidad Nacional de La Plata.
    9. Javier Alejo & Santiago Garganta, 2014. "Pobreza Crónica y Transitoria: Evidencia para Argentina 1997-2012," CEDLAS, Working Papers 0175, CEDLAS, Universidad Nacional de La Plata.
    10. Bertranou, Fabio & Casanova, Luis & Sarabia, Marianela, 2013. "How, Why and in What Sectors Employment Informality Decreased in Argentina from 2003 to 2012," MPRA Paper 47467, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item


    Informalidad; protección social; AUH; Argentina;

    JEL classification:

    • H55 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Social Security and Public Pensions
    • I38 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Government Programs; Provision and Effects of Welfare Programs
    • O17 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Formal and Informal Sectors; Shadow Economy; Institutional Arrangements

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:dls:wpaper:0133. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Ana Pacheco). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.