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Measuring Ethno-Linguistic Affinity between Nations

Author

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  • Olaf J. de Groot

Abstract

Research on ethno-linguistic ties has so far mostly focused on domestic measures of ethno-linguistic heterogeneity. Little attention has been given to the possibility that ethno-linguistic relations between countries may affect out- comes, particularly in a spatial econometric context. In this paper, I propose a way of measuring Ethno-Linguistic Affinity between nations. This new index measures the degree of similarity two randomly drawn individuals from two different populations can be expected to display. I show that this measure has a number of attractive theoretical characteristics, which make it particularly useful and continue to actually construct such a measure for all countries in Africa. Finally, using this measure of Ethno-Linguistic Affinity, I show that civil conflict in Africa is likely to spill over between contiguous ethno-linguistically similar countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Olaf J. de Groot, 2009. "Measuring Ethno-Linguistic Affinity between Nations," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 921, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:diw:diwwpp:dp921
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    File URL: http://www.diw.de/documents/publikationen/73/diw_01.c.340399.de/dp921.pdf
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    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Are ethnic differences across nations relevant?
      by Economic Logician in Economic Logic on 2009-11-19 21:20:00

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    Cited by:

    1. Philipp Kolo, 2016. "A dissimilarity-adjusted index of ethnic diversity: Measurement and implications for findings on conflict, growth and trade," Courant Research Centre: Poverty, Equity and Growth - Discussion Papers 195, Courant Research Centre PEG.
    2. Olaf De Groot, 2010. "The Spillover Effects Of Conflict On Economic Growth In Neighbouring Countries In Africa," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 21(2), pages 149-164.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Ethno-Linguistic heterogeneity; spatial econometrics; conflict; Africa;

    JEL classification:

    • C21 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models
    • F51 - International Economics - - International Relations, National Security, and International Political Economy - - - International Conflicts; Negotiations; Sanctions
    • O10 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - General

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