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Temporary Agency Work in the SOEP: Coping with Data Quality Problems


  • Holger Schäfer


In principle, the SOEP is a highly adequate data source for analyzing the socio-economic background of temporary agency workers. In this paper, it's argued that on second glance, the SOEP's temp worker variable shows severe problems with data quality. An easy-to-use adjustment procedure is proposed that alleviates the problem, but is not an encompassing solution. Therefore, it is concluded that in the long term, the questionnaire needs to be improved.

Suggested Citation

  • Holger Schäfer, 2012. "Temporary Agency Work in the SOEP: Coping with Data Quality Problems," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 454, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
  • Handle: RePEc:diw:diwsop:diw_sp454

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item


    Temporary agency work; panel surveys;

    JEL classification:

    • C83 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Data Collection and Data Estimation Methodology; Computer Programs - - - Survey Methods; Sampling Methods
    • J53 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor-Management Relations, Trade Unions, and Collective Bargaining - - - Labor-Management Relations; Industrial Jurisprudence

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