IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/diw/diwesc/diwesc24.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Worker Displacement in Russia and Ukraine: A Comparative Analysis Using Micro Data

Author

Listed:
  • Hartmut Lehmann
  • Alexander Muravyev
  • Norberto Pignatti
  • Anzelika Zaiceva

Abstract

Using unique data from a supplement to the RLMS on displaced workers in Russia and from the Ukrainian Longitudinal Monitoring Survey (ULMS) we analyze and provide the first solid evidence on displacement in Russia and Ukraine in a period of growth. Our estimates establish that quits dominate separations but that displacement rates are clearly not negligible amounting to between 2.5 and 3 percent of employment in Russia and between 2 and 5 percent in Ukraine. We also show that displacements are not random. Results that are valid across both countries demonstrate that unskilled and less educated workers are more affected as are workers in the agricultural sector. In countries like Russia and Ukraine where unemployment benefits are not generous or non-existent for the average worker long spells of non-employment can impose large monetary costs on workers. Presenting cumulative return rates for job movers we point to these costs by highlighting the fact that there is a very sizable privileged group of displaced workers who finds a new job within a very short time while the majority has difficulty in finding new employment. It is this group (larger in Ukraine than in Russia), which is not so rapidly absorbed by the labor market, that should be the target of social policy intervention by the Russian and Ukrainian governments.

Suggested Citation

  • Hartmut Lehmann & Alexander Muravyev & Norberto Pignatti & Anzelika Zaiceva, 2010. "Worker Displacement in Russia and Ukraine: A Comparative Analysis Using Micro Data," ESCIRRU Working Papers 24, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:diw:diwesc:diwesc24
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.diw.de/documents/publikationen/73/diw_01.c.353292.de/diw_escirru0024.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Yuhao Ge & Hartmut Lehmann, 2013. "The costs of worker displacement in urban labor markets of China," IZA Journal of Labor & Development, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 2(1), pages 1-23, December.
    2. Hartmut Lehmann & Alexander Muravyev & Klaus Zimmermann, 2012. "The Ukrainian longitudinal monitoring survey: towards a better understanding of labor markets in transition," IZA Journal of Labor & Development, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 1(1), pages 1-15, December.
    3. Y. Ge & H. Lehmann, 2013. "The Costs of Worker Displacement in Urban Labor Markets of China," Working Papers wp876, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.
    4. Tom Coupé & Hannah Vakhitova, 2013. "Costs and Benefits of Labour Mobility between the EU and the Eastern Partnership Partner Countries. Country report: Ukraine," CASE Network Studies and Analyses 0464, CASE-Center for Social and Economic Research.

    More about this item

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:diw:diwesc:diwesc24. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Bibliothek). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/diwbede.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.