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Period parity progression measures with continued fertility postponement: a new look at the implications of delayed childbearing for cohort fertility

Author

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  • Hans-Peter Kohler

    (Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany)

  • José A. Ortega

Abstract

In this paper we introduce a new set of period parity progression measures with continued fertility postponement in order to account for two distinct implications caused by delays in childbearing: tempo distortions imply an underestimation of quantum of fertility in observed period data, and the fertility aging effect reduces higher parity births because the respective exposure is shifted to older ages where the probability of having another child is quite low. Our measures remove the distortion and provide means to assess the latter aging effect. The measures therefore provide an unified toolkit of fertility measures that (a) facilitate the description and analysis of past period fertility trends in terms of synthetic cohort behavior, and (b) allow the projection of the timing, level and distribution of cohort fertility using the most recently observed period-quantum and tempo changes. Due to their explicit relation to cohort behavior, these measures extend and improve the existing adjustment of the total fertility rate. We apply these methods to Sweden during 1970-1999. (AUTHORS)

Suggested Citation

  • Hans-Peter Kohler & José A. Ortega, 2001. "Period parity progression measures with continued fertility postponement: a new look at the implications of delayed childbearing for cohort fertility," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2001-001, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:dem:wpaper:wp-2001-001
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    File URL: http://www.demographic-research.org/Volumes/vol6/6
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Tomas Frejka & Gérad Calot, 2001. "Cohort childbearing age patterns in low-fertility countries in the late 20th century: Is the postponement of births an inherent element?," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2001-009, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    2. Evert van Imhoff, 2001. "On the impossibility of inferring cohort fertility measures from period fertility measures," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 5(2), pages 23-64, September.
    3. Hans-Peter Kohler & Dimiter Philipov, 2001. "Variance effects in the bongaarts-feeney formula," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 38(1), pages 1-16, February.
    4. Hans-Peter Kohler & Lisbeth B. Knudsen & Axel Skytthe & Kaare Christensen, 2002. "The fertility pattern of twins and the general population compared: evidence from Danish cohorts 1945-64," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2002-005, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • Z0 - Other Special Topics - - General

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