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Is Financial Openness bad for Education? A Political Economy Perspective on Development

Author

Listed:
  • Bourguignon, F.
  • Verdier, T.

Abstract

This paper presents a simple model of the links between education, democratization and economic development. In a context of imperfect capital markets, we investigate the incentives for a capitalist oligarchy to subsidize the education of poor workers and to initiate a political transition.

Suggested Citation

  • Bourguignon, F. & Verdier, T., 1999. "Is Financial Openness bad for Education? A Political Economy Perspective on Development," DELTA Working Papers 1999-20, DELTA (Ecole normale supérieure).
  • Handle: RePEc:del:abcdef:1999-20
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Mo, Pak Hung, 2000. "Income Inequality and Economic Growth," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 53(3), pages 293-315.
    2. Bourguignon, Francois & Verdier, Thierry, 2000. "Oligarchy, democracy, inequality and growth," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 62(2), pages 285-313, August.
    3. Lewis, Tracy R. & Feenstra, Robert & Ware, Roger, 1989. "Eliminating price supports : A political economy perspective," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(2), pages 159-185, November.
    4. Roberto Perotti, 1993. "Political Equilibrium, Income Distribution, and Growth," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 60(4), pages 755-776.
    5. Feenstra, Robert C, 1987. " Incentive Compatible Trade Policies," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 89(3), pages 373-387.
    6. Romer, Thomas, 1975. "Individual welfare, majority voting, and the properties of a linear income tax," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 4(2), pages 163-185, February.
    7. Spector, David, 2001. "Is it possible to redistribute the gains from trade using income taxation?," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(2), pages 441-460, December.
    8. repec:cup:apsrev:v:89:y:1995:i:02:p:271-294_09 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Bruno Frey, 1971. "Why do high income people participate more in politics?," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 11(1), pages 101-105, September.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Sebastian Galiani & Daniel Heymann, 2005. "Land-Rich Economies, Education and Economic Development," DEGIT Conference Papers c010_048, DEGIT, Dynamics, Economic Growth, and International Trade.
    2. Debajyoti Chakrabarty & Areendam Chanda & Chetan Ghate, 2005. "Education and Growth in the Presence of Capital Flight," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 477, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    3. Chakrabarty Debajyoti & Chanda Areendam & Ghate Chetan, 2006. "Education, Growth, and Redistribution in the Presence of Capital Flight," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 6(2), pages 1-41, November.
    4. Ruben Segura-Cayuela, 2006. "Inefficient Policies, Inefficient Institutions and Trade," 2006 Meeting Papers 502, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    5. Galiani, Sebastian & Heymann, Daniel & Dabús, Carlos & Tohmé, Fernando, 2008. "On the emergence of public education in land-rich economies," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 86(2), pages 434-446, June.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS ; ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ; GOVERNMENT;

    JEL classification:

    • F2 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business
    • H1 - Public Economics - - Structure and Scope of Government
    • I2 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education
    • O1 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development

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