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Sector Education Training Authorities and the Delivery of Training: Preliminary Remarks on the New Skills Dispensation in South Africa


  • Paul Lundall

    () (Independent Consultant, Cape Town)


The workplace training dispensation that is evolving in South Africa represents a significant advance over previous initiatives in the country. While it is funded on the basis of payroll levies, the relatively sophisticated institutional structure in the administration of the system has caused delays in its set-up and operation. Some of these problems have been caused by delays in putting the appropriate institutions into place. Others have been caused by difficulties in aligning the training system to the educational system. From the outset these problems, coupled with the obligation to adhere to the requirements of a national qualifications framework in order to start the training process have hopelessly compromised the planned outputs of the system vis-à-vis training. The paper discusses these problems with respect to the training of apprentices and recommends that at a systemic level the vocational mandate and vocational requirements need to be given greater priority and command within the National Skills Development Strategy.

Suggested Citation

  • Paul Lundall, 2003. "Sector Education Training Authorities and the Delivery of Training: Preliminary Remarks on the New Skills Dispensation in South Africa," Working Papers 03079, University of Cape Town, Development Policy Research Unit.
  • Handle: RePEc:ctw:wpaper:03079

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    3. George J. Stigler, 1971. "The Theory of Economic Regulation," Bell Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 2(1), pages 3-21, Spring.
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    7. Dorothe Bonjour, 2000. "Are civil servants paid too much? - A distributional analysis of the public-private wage gap in Switzerland," Swiss Journal of Economics and Statistics (SJES), Swiss Society of Economics and Statistics (SSES), vol. 136(IV), pages 557-578, December.
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    10. Sandrine Rospabé, 2001. "Making Racial Wage Relations Fair in South Africa: A Focus on the Role of Trade Unions," Working Papers 01048, University of Cape Town, Development Policy Research Unit.
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    Cited by:

    1. Geeta Kingdon & John Knight, 2007. "Unemployment in South Africa, 1995--2003: Causes, Problems and Policies," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 16(5), pages 813-848, November.


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