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Electronic Resources and Heterodox Economists


  • Fabio D'Orlando

    (University of Cassino)


The idea of measuring scientific relevance by counting citations is gaining ever-growing consensus among economists, and thanks to the electronic bibliographic resources now available the procedure has become relatively simple and fast. However, when it comes to putting the idea into practice many challenging problems emerge. This paper uses five of the principal bibliographic electronic resources (EconLit, JSTOR, Web of Science, Scopus and Google Scholar) to test the practical applicability of this method for measuring relevance to the particular case of heterodox economics.

Suggested Citation

  • Fabio D'Orlando, 2009. "Electronic Resources and Heterodox Economists," Working Papers 2009-02, Universita' di Cassino, Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche.
  • Handle: RePEc:css:wpaper:2009-02

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Richard H. Adams, Jr., 1992. "The Effects of Migration and Remittances on Inequality in Rural Pakistan," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 31(4), pages 1189-1206.
    2. Adams, Richard H, Jr, 1989. "Worker Remittances and Inequality in Rural Egypt," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 38(1), pages 45-71, October.
    3. Atkinson,Anthony Barnes & Micklewright,John, 1992. "Economic Transformation in Eastern Europe and the Distribution of Income," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521438827, March.
    4. Rapoport, Hillel & Docquier, Frederic, 2006. "The Economics of Migrants' Remittances," Handbook on the Economics of Giving, Reciprocity and Altruism, Elsevier.
    5. Taylor, J. Edward, 1992. "Remittances and inequality reconsidered: Direct, indirect, and intertemporal effects," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 14(2), pages 187-208, April.
    6. Schrooten, Mechthild, 2005. "Bringing home the money: what determines worker's remittances to transition countries?," Discussion Paper Series a466, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    7. Barry McCormick & Jackline Wahba, 2003. "Return International Migration and Geographical Inequality: The Case of Egypt," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 12(4), pages 500-532, December.
    8. Stark, Oded & Taylor, J. Edward & Yitzhaki, Shlomo, 1988. "Migration, remittances and inequality : A sensitivity analysis using the extended Gini index," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 309-322, May.
    9. Miguel León-Ledesma & Matloob Piracha, 2001. "International Migration and the Role of Remittances in Eastern Europe," Studies in Economics 0113, School of Economics, University of Kent.
    10. Barham, Bradford & Boucher, Stephen, 1998. "Migration, remittances, and inequality: estimating the net effects of migration on income distribution," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(2), pages 307-331, April.
    11. repec:ebl:ecbull:v:15:y:2008:i:1:p:1-11 is not listed on IDEAS
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    More about this item


    heterodox economists; EconLit; JSTOR; Web of Science; Scopus; Google Scholar;

    JEL classification:

    • B24 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - History of Economic Thought since 1925 - - - Socialist; Marxist; Scraffian
    • B25 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - History of Economic Thought since 1925 - - - Historical; Institutional; Evolutionary; Austrian; Stockholm School
    • B31 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - History of Economic Thought: Individuals - - - Individuals
    • B51 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Current Heterodox Approaches - - - Socialist; Marxian; Sraffian
    • B52 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Current Heterodox Approaches - - - Historical; Institutional; Evolutionary
    • B53 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Current Heterodox Approaches - - - Austrian


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