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Is it Harmful to Allow partial Cooperation ?

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  • Paul Beaudry

    (Crest)

  • Pierre Cahuc

    (Crest)

  • Hubert Kempf

    (Crest)

Abstract

In economics, politics and society, examples abound in economics, politics and society where agents can enter partial cooperation schemes, i.e., they can collude with a subset of agents. Several contributions devoted to specific settings have claimed that such partial cooperation actually worsens welfare compared to the no-cooperation situation. Our paper assesses this view by highlighting the forces that lead to such results. We find that the nature of strategic spillovers is central to determining whether partial cooperation is bad. Our propositions are then applied to various examples as industry wage bargaining or local public goods. Copyright 2000 by The editors of the Scandinavian Journal of Economics.
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  • Paul Beaudry & Pierre Cahuc & Hubert Kempf, 1999. "Is it Harmful to Allow partial Cooperation ?," Working Papers 99-39, Center for Research in Economics and Statistics.
  • Handle: RePEc:crs:wpaper:99-39
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    Cited by:

    1. Ruud A. de Mooij & Hendrik Vrijburg, 2012. "Tax Rates as Strategic Substitutes," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 12-104/VI, Tinbergen Institute.
    2. Hendrik Vrijburg & Ruud A. de Mooij, 2010. "Enhanced Coorporation in an asymmetric model of Tax Competition," Working Papers 1002, Oxford University Centre for Business Taxation.
    3. Yutao Han, 2013. "Who benefits from partial tax coordination?," CREA Discussion Paper Series 13-24, Center for Research in Economic Analysis, University of Luxembourg.
    4. Emmanuelle Taugourdeau & Jean-pierre Vidal, 2014. "The tax competition game revisited: When leadership may be optimal," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, pages 51-62.
    5. Leon Bettendorf & Albert Van Der Horst & Ruud A. De Mooij & Hendrik Vrijburg, 2010. "Corporate Tax Consolidation and Enhanced Cooperation in the European Union," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, pages 453-479.
    6. Bo Sandemann Rasmussen, "undated". "Partial vs. Global Coordination of Capital Income Tax Policies," Economics Working Papers 2001-3, Department of Economics and Business Economics, Aarhus University.
    7. Lina Mallozzi & Stef Tijs, 2012. "Stackelberg Assumption vs. Nash Assumption in Partially Cooperative Games," Czech Economic Review, Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute of Economic Studies, vol. 6(1), pages 5-13, March.
    8. Sanz Córdoba, Patrícia & Theilen, Bernd, 1965-, 2016. "Partial tax harmonization through infrastructure coordination," Working Papers 2072/261535, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Department of Economics.
    9. Hendrik Vrijburg & Ruud Mooij, 2016. "Tax rates as strategic substitutes," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 23(1), pages 2-24, February.

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