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Adjustment Difficulties within a European Monetary Union: Can They be Reduced?

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  • Hughes Hallett, Andrew
  • Vines, David

Abstract

This paper analyses four costs which may be associated with monetary union. First it (obviously) allows no `relative' monetary accommodation of the kind which may assist when dealing with asymmetric shocks. This can impose significant adjustment costs. Second it does not of itself prevent `absolute' accommodation to an inflation shock originating in all members, or even one member, of the union. Third, the distribution of benefits of membership of the union may be skewed. Finally, a union may require significant fiscal flexibility to mitigate against the adjustment costs. We investigate the form of fiscal flexibility which may be required, and we also propose a form of Soft Monetary Union which might alleviate the first problem.

Suggested Citation

  • Hughes Hallett, Andrew & Vines, David, 1991. "Adjustment Difficulties within a European Monetary Union: Can They be Reduced?," CEPR Discussion Papers 517, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:517
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Barry Eichengreen & Jürgen Hagen, 1996. "Fiscal restrictions and monetary union: Rationales, repercussions, reforms," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 23(1), pages 3-23, February.
    2. Tatiana Kirsanova & Mathan Satchi & David Vines & Simon Wren-Lewis, 2007. "Optimal Fiscal Policy Rules in a Monetary Union," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 39(7), pages 1759-1784, October.
    3. Laurence Boone, 1997. "Symmetry and Asymmetry of Supply and Demand Shocks in the European Union," Working Papers 1997-03, CEPII research center.
    4. Barry Eichengreen and Jurgen von Hagen., 1995. "Fiscal Policy and Monetary Union: Federalism, Fiscal Restrictions and the No-Bailout Rule," Center for International and Development Economics Research (CIDER) Working Papers C95-056, University of California at Berkeley.
    5. Jean-Paul Fitoussi & Marc Flandreau, 1994. "Le Système monétaire international et l'Union monétaire européenne," Revue de l'OFCE, Programme National Persée, vol. 51(1), pages 167-181.
    6. Christodoulakis, Nicos & Garratt, Anthony & Currie, David, 1996. "Target zones and alternative proposals for G3 policy coordination: An empirical evaluation using GEM," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 49-68.
    7. Barry Eichengreen & Jurgen von Hagen, 1996. "Fiscal Policy and Monetary Union: Is There a Tradeoff between Federalism and Budgetary Restrictions?," NBER Working Papers 5517, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    EMU; Fiscal Rules;

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