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Heterogenous Wage Formation Under A Common Monetary Policy


  • Andersen, Torben M


How does a monetary union work when labour markets are heterogeneous? Since shocks are transmitted via both trade links and the common monetary policy and propagated via labour market responses, it follows that labour market institutions may have not only national but also union-wide implications. These issues are analysed in an intertemporal general equilibrium model for a currency union in which labour markets are heterogenous and where the monetary policy targets expected inflation. More flexibility in adjustment means more stable aggregate output, but inflation control becomes more difficult. Heterogeneity in adjustment plays a large role, in particular if country sizes are also asymmetric. This also holds in the case of aggregate shocks both for the variability of aggregate output and inflation. Considering the effects on country specific output variability it is seen that there are important spillover effects between labour market structures, and that it is not necessarily beneficial to make a unilateral move to make labour markets more flexible.

Suggested Citation

  • Andersen, Torben M, 2004. "Heterogenous Wage Formation Under A Common Monetary Policy," CEPR Discussion Papers 4430, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:4430

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    Cited by:

    1. Alfonso Arpaia & Karl Pichelmann, 2007. "Nominal and real wage flexibility in EMU," International Economics and Economic Policy, Springer, vol. 4(3), pages 299-328, November.
    2. Andersen, Torben M., 2008. "The macroeconomic policy mix in a monetary union with flexible inflation targeting," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 27(3), pages 411-437, April.

    More about this item


    business cycles; monetary policy; monetary union; shocks; wage formation;

    JEL classification:

    • E30 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • F41 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Open Economy Macroeconomics


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