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The Impact of Location on Firm Growth

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  • Audretsch, David B
  • Dohse, Dirk

Abstract

This Paper links the performance of new technology firms, measured in terms of growth, to geographic location. We introduce a model of firm growth that is specific to characteristics of the location as well as the firm and industry. The model is estimated using a new dataset identifying the growth performance of small technology-based firms. In fact, firm performance, as measured by employment growth, does appear to be influenced by locational characteristics as well as characteristics specific to the firm and the industry. In particular, the empirical evidence suggests that being located in an agglomeration rich in knowledge resources is more conducive to firm growth than being located in a region that is less endowed with knowledge resources. These results suggest the economic value of location as a conduit for accessing external knowledge resources, which in turn, manifests itself in higher rates of growth.

Suggested Citation

  • Audretsch, David B & Dohse, Dirk, 2004. "The Impact of Location on Firm Growth," CEPR Discussion Papers 4332, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:4332
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    agglomeration; firm growth; knowledge spillovers;

    JEL classification:

    • L10 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - General
    • O12 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • O30 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - General
    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes

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