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Unemployment and Wages of Ethnic Germans

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  • Bauer, Thomas
  • Zimmermann, Klaus F

Abstract

This paper uses the immigration sample of the German Socioeconomic Panel to analyse the earnings and unemployment assimilation of ethnic Germans who entered West Germany within the last ten years. The empirical analysis suggests that there is no earnings differential between immigrants from Eastern Europe and comparable East Germans at the time of immigration. With longer time of residence the earnings of former East Europeans rise faster than those of East Germans, however. Migrants from Poland and the former USSR have higher unemployment risks than those from East Germany or Romania. Ethnic networks are shown to be very useful for a successful integration into the labour market.

Suggested Citation

  • Bauer, Thomas & Zimmermann, Klaus F, 1996. "Unemployment and Wages of Ethnic Germans," CEPR Discussion Papers 1512, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:1512
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    5. Schmidt, Christoph M & Zimmermann, Klaus F, 1991. "Work Characteristics, Firm Size and Wages," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 73(4), pages 705-710, November.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Earnings Assimilation; Immigration of Ethnic Germans; Unemployment;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search

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