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Evaluación económica del proyecto Sistema Estratégico de Transporte Público de Pasajeros para la Ciudad de Pasto""

Author

Listed:
  • César Alberto Arcos Tiuso

    ()

  • Luis David Pulido Blasi

    ()

  • Abel Antonio Rincón Mesa

    ()

  • Ricardo Andrés Molina Suárez

    ()

Abstract

Este trabajo presenta la evaluación financiera y económica del "Sistema Estratégico de Transporte Público de Pasajeros para la Ciudad de Pasto - SETP". Se desarrollo una metodología para la conceptualización y estimación de los beneficios y costos. Como resultado se destaca que el proyecto requiere del aporte de la Nación y de Pasto para ser financieramente viable. Asimismo, debido a que en ciudades intermedias como Pasto los niveles de congestión existentes son bajos y los tiempos de viaje cortos, no se evidenciaron grandes beneficios en ahorros de tiempo con la implementación del SETP; pero sí beneficios importantes en ahorro de costos operativos y la generación de viajes atraídos por el sistema.

Suggested Citation

  • César Alberto Arcos Tiuso & Luis David Pulido Blasi & Abel Antonio Rincón Mesa & Ricardo Andrés Molina Suárez, 2011. "Evaluación económica del proyecto Sistema Estratégico de Transporte Público de Pasajeros para la Ciudad de Pasto""," DOCUMENTOS CEDE 008911, UNIVERSIDAD DE LOS ANDES-CEDE.
  • Handle: RePEc:col:000089:008911
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    File URL: http://economia.uniandes.edu.co/publicaciones/dcede2011-27.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Evaluación económica; Sistema Estratégico de Transporte Público; Análisis costo beneficio.;

    JEL classification:

    • D61 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Allocative Efficiency; Cost-Benefit Analysis
    • H43 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods - - - Project Evaluation; Social Discount Rate
    • L91 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Transportation and Utilities - - - Transportation: General
    • R41 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Transportation Economics - - - Transportation: Demand, Supply, and Congestion; Travel Time; Safety and Accidents; Transportation Noise
    • R42 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Transportation Economics - - - Government and Private Investment Analysis; Road Maintenance; Transportation Planning

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