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Innovation and Equilibrium?

  • Martin Shubik

This Companion provides a timely and engaging treatment of Hyman Minsky’s approach to economics, which is enjoying a renewed appreciation because of its prescient analysis of the slow but sure transformation of the capitalist economy in the post-war period. Many have called the global financial crisis that began in the United States in 2007 a ‘Minsky crisis’, and these original contributions demonstrate precisely why both academic economists as well as policymakers have turned to Minsky for guidance. The book brings together the foremost Minsky scholars to provide a comprehensive overview of his approach, with extensions to bring the analysis up to date.

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Paper provided by David K. Levine in its series Levine's Working Paper Archive with number 814577000000000151.

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Date of creation: 27 Feb 2009
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Handle: RePEc:cla:levarc:814577000000000151
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.dklevine.com/

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  1. Giovanni Dosi & Christopher Freeman & Richard Nelson & Gerarld Silverberg & Luc Soete (ed.), 1988. "Technical Change and Economic Theory," LEM Book Series, Laboratory of Economics and Management (LEM), Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa, Italy, number dosietal-1988, August.
  2. Lucas, Robert E, Jr, 1980. "Equilibrium in a Pure Currency Economy," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 18(2), pages 203-20, April.
  3. Koopmans, Tjalling C, 1977. "Concepts of Optimality and Their Uses," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 67(3), pages 261-74, June.
  4. Sorin, S., 1994. "Strategic Market Games with Exchange Rates," Papers 9411, Paris X - Nanterre, U.F.R. de Sc. Ec. Gest. Maths Infor..
  5. Martin Shubik, 1977. "A Theory of Money and Financial Institutions," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 462, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
  6. Sahi, Siddhartha & Yao, Shuntian, 1989. "The non-cooperative equilibria of a trading economy with complete markets and consistent prices," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 325-346, September.
  7. Martin Shubik, 1972. "A Theory of Money and Financial Institutions. Part V. The Rate of Interest on Fiat Money in a Closed Economy," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 338, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
  8. Arthur, W Brian, 1989. "Competing Technologies, Increasing Returns, and Lock-In by Historical Events," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 99(394), pages 116-31, March.
  9. Daniel Ellsberg, 1961. "Risk, Ambiguity, and the Savage Axioms," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 75(4), pages 643-669.
  10. Gode, Dhananjay K & Sunder, Shyam, 1993. "Allocative Efficiency of Markets with Zero-Intelligence Traders: Market as a Partial Substitute for Individual Rationality," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 101(1), pages 119-37, February.
  11. Martin Shubik, 1972. "A Theory of Money and Financial Institutions. Part IV. Fiat Money and Noncooperative Equilibrium in a Closed Economy," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 330, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
  12. Juergen Huber & Martin Shubik & Shyam Sunder, 2007. "Three Minimal Market Games: Theory and Experimental Evidence," Levine's Bibliography 122247000000001480, UCLA Department of Economics.
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