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A Spatial Dynamic Panel Model with Random Effects Applied to Commuting Times

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  • Olivier Parent
  • James P. Lesage

    ()

Abstract

A space-time filter is set forth for spatial panel data situations that include random effects. We propose a general spatial dynamic specification that encompasses several spatiotemporal models previously used in the panel data literature. We apply the model to the case of highway induced travel demand. The theory of induced travel demand asserts that increased highway capacity will induce growth in traffic for a number of reasons. Our model allows us to quantify the spatial spillover impacts of increased highway capacity at one location in the network on travel times in neighboring locations and in future time periods.

Suggested Citation

  • Olivier Parent & James P. Lesage, 2010. "A Spatial Dynamic Panel Model with Random Effects Applied to Commuting Times," University of Cincinnati, Economics Working Papers Series 2010-01, University of Cincinnati, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:cin:ucecwp:2010-01
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Koop,Gary & Poirier,Dale J. & Tobias,Justin L., 2007. "Bayesian Econometric Methods," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521671736.
    2. Yu, Jihai & de Jong, Robert & Lee, Lung-fei, 2008. "Quasi-maximum likelihood estimators for spatial dynamic panel data with fixed effects when both n and T are large," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 146(1), pages 118-134, September.
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    5. Noland, Robert B., 2001. "Relationships between highway capacity and induced vehicle travel," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 35(1), pages 47-72, January.
    6. Su, Liangjun & Yang, Zhenlin, 2015. "QML estimation of dynamic panel data models with spatial errors," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 185(1), pages 230-258.
    7. Shirley, Chad & Winston, Clifford, 2004. "Firm inventory behavior and the returns from highway infrastructure investments," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(2), pages 398-415, March.
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    10. repec:spr:stemec:978-3-7908-2070-6 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Parent, Olivier & LeSage, James P., 2012. "Spatial dynamic panel data models with random effects," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(4), pages 727-738.
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    14. J. Barkley Rosser, 2009. "Introduction," Chapters,in: Handbook of Research on Complexity, chapter 1 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    15. Van Ommeren, Jos & Fosgerau, Mogens, 2009. "Workers' marginal costs of commuting," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 65(1), pages 38-47, January.
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C11 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Bayesian Analysis: General
    • C21 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models
    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes

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