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Who is Afraid of School Choice?

Author

Listed:
  • Andrea Diem
  • Stefan C. Wolter

Abstract

This study uses survey data to investigate attitudes among Swiss voters to different models offering more freedom of choice in the educational system. The findings indicate clear opposition to the use of taxpayer money to fund private schools, while free choice between public schools seems to appeal to a majority. The analyses show that the approval-opposition heterogeneity is mainly based on an explicable, rational calculation of personal utility. Approval rates are much higher among groups or individuals who see a personal advantage in more school choice, such as parents of school-age children, urban/metropolitan area residents and those on a low income. In contrast, residents of small to medium-sized centers of population, high-income groups, and individuals with a teaching qualification oppose more school choice. The analyses also indicate differences between the country’s language regions, attributable to intercultural differences in what people consider the state’s role to be.

Suggested Citation

  • Andrea Diem & Stefan C. Wolter, 2011. "Who is Afraid of School Choice?," CESifo Working Paper Series 3385, CESifo Group Munich.
  • Handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_3385
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    File URL: http://www.cesifo-group.de/DocDL/cesifo1_wp3385.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Chantal Oggenfuss & Stefan C. Wolter, 2014. "Are the education policy preferences of teachers just a reflection of their occupational concerns?," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0101, University of Zurich, Department of Business Administration (IBW).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    school choice; survey; private schools; education vouchers;

    JEL classification:

    • D72 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Political Processes: Rent-seeking, Lobbying, Elections, Legislatures, and Voting Behavior
    • H24 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Personal Income and Other Nonbusiness Taxes and Subsidies
    • H52 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Education
    • I22 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Educational Finance; Financial Aid

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