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Path Dependence, Endogenous Innovation and Growth

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  • Stephen Redding

Abstract

We consider a macroeconomic model of endogenous innovation and growth, in which technological progress is path dependent and technological lock-in may occur. These features of technological change are emphasised in the historical and microeconomic literatures, and are formalised here using a distinction between fundamental and secondary knowledge. Secondary knowledge spills over imperfectly across fundamental technologies, and the historical path of technological development is a central determinant of endogenous rates of technological change. Economic growth depends on the extent of secondary knowledge accumulation, and leapfrogging in cross-country levels of income per capita may occur.

Suggested Citation

  • Stephen Redding, 1999. "Path Dependence, Endogenous Innovation and Growth," CEP Discussion Papers dp0424, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  • Handle: RePEc:cep:cepdps:dp0424
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Parente Stephen L., 1994. "Technology Adoption, Learning-by-Doing, and Economic Growth," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 63(2), pages 346-369, August.
    2. Broadberry, S N, 1994. "Technological Leadership and Productivity Leadership in Manufacturing since the Industrial Revolution: Implications for the Convergence Debate," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 104(423), pages 291-302, March.
    3. Arthur, W Brian, 1989. "Competing Technologies, Increasing Returns, and Lock-In by Historical Events," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 99(394), pages 116-131, March.
    4. Brezis, Elise S & Krugman, Paul R & Tsiddon, Daniel, 1993. "Leapfrogging in International Competition: A Theory of Cycles in National Technological Leadership," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(5), pages 1211-1219, December.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Klaus Wälde, 2005. "Endogenous Growth Cycles," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 46(3), pages 867-894, August.
    2. Horii, Ryo, 2012. "Wants and past knowledge: Growth cycles with emerging industries," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 36(2), pages 220-238.
    3. Suk Choi & Christopher Williams, 2014. "The impact of innovation intensity, scope, and spillovers on sales growth in Chinese firms," Asia Pacific Journal of Management, Springer, vol. 31(1), pages 25-46, March.
    4. Kverndokk, Snorre & Rosendahl, Knut Einar & Rutherford, Thomas F., 2004. "Climate policies and induced technological change: Impacts and timing of technology subsidies," Memorandum 05/2004, Oslo University, Department of Economics.
    5. Kverndokk, Snorre & Rosendahl, Knut Einar, 2007. "Climate policies and learning by doing: Impacts and timing of technology subsidies," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 58-82, January.
    6. Ghosh, Arghya & Kato, Takao & Morita, Hodaka, 2017. "Incremental innovation and competitive pressure in the presence of discrete innovation," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 135(C), pages 1-14.
    7. Ghosh, Arghya & Kato, Takao & Morita, Hodika, 2007. "Discrete Innovation, Continuous Improvement, and Competitive Pressure," Working Papers 104-27, Department of Economics, Colgate University.
    8. Schlegel, Christoph, 2004. "Analytical and Numerical Solution of a Poisson RBC model," Dresden Discussion Paper Series in Economics 05/04, Technische Universität Dresden, Faculty of Business and Economics, Department of Economics.
    9. Ahmed S. Rahman, 2017. "Rise of the Machines Redux – Education, Technological Transition and Long-run Growth," Departmental Working Papers 61, United States Naval Academy Department of Economics.
    10. Ron Martin & Peter Sunley, 2010. "The Place of Path Dependence in an Evolutionary Perspective on the Economic Landscape," Chapters,in: The Handbook of Evolutionary Economic Geography, chapter 3 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    11. Gartland, Myles P., 2005. "Interdisciplinary views of sub-optimal outcomes: Path dependence in the social and management sciences," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 34(5), pages 686-702, October.
    12. Kamm, Aaron & Koch, Christian & Nikiforakis, Nikos, 2017. "The ghost of institutions past: History as an obstacle to fighting tax evasion," Annual Conference 2017 (Vienna): Alternative Structures for Money and Banking 168271, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    13. Ghani, Gairuzazmi M., 2012. "Does trade liberalization effect energy consumption?," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 285-290.
    14. Gigante, Anna Azzurra, 2016. "“Reviewing Path Dependence Theory in Economics: Micro–Foundations of Endogenous Change Processes”," MPRA Paper 75310, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    15. Maki, Taichi & Yotsuya, Koichi & Yagi, Tadashi, 2005. "Economic growth and the riskiness of investment in firm-specific skills," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 49(4), pages 1033-1049, May.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • O31 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Innovation and Invention: Processes and Incentives
    • O40 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - General

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