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Previdência social e desigualdade racial no Brasil


  • Paola La Guardia Zorzin


  • Simone Wajnman


  • Cássio Maldonado Turra



We examine how Social Security affects the distribution of resources between racial groups in Brazil. To do this, we apply two methodological perspectives. Using a life-cycle perspective, we compare contributions and benefits accrued over the life cycle of representative individuals of each racial group. From a period or cross-sectional perspective, we compare social security transfers in a specific year. The goal is to measure how differences in age composition affect transfers between groups, each period. The results show that the social security perform three important roles that are inextricably linked: in the life cycle perspective, recourses are transferred from whites to blacks, buffering the effects of racial labor income differences during active years; in the cross-sectional perspective, social security transfers reduce income inequality and poverty among black and balance the participation of both racial groups in the social security budget, despite the larger proportion of young people among blacks.

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  • Paola La Guardia Zorzin & Simone Wajnman & Cássio Maldonado Turra, 2011. "Previdência social e desigualdade racial no Brasil," Textos para Discussão Cedeplar-UFMG td448, Cedeplar, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais.
  • Handle: RePEc:cdp:texdis:td448

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    More about this item


    Social security; population aging; race disparities.;

    JEL classification:

    • H50 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - General
    • J11 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Demographic Trends, Macroeconomic Effects, and Forecasts
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination

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