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Path Selection and Route Preference in Human Navigation: A Progress Report

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  • Golledge, Reginald G.

Abstract

Two critical characteristics of human wayfinding are destination choice and path selection. Traditionally, the path selection problem has been ignored or assumed to be the result of minimizing procedures such as selecting the shortest path, the quickest path or the least costly path. In this paper I draw on existing literature from cognitive mapping and cognitive distance, to define possible route selection criteria other than these traditional ones. Experiments with route selection on maps and in the field are then described and analyzed to determine which criteria appear to be used as the environment changes and as one increases the number of nodes along a path (i.e., as trip chaining replaces a simple Origin-Destination (O-D) pairing.

Suggested Citation

  • Golledge, Reginald G., 1995. "Path Selection and Route Preference in Human Navigation: A Progress Report," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt9jn5r27v, University of California Transportation Center.
  • Handle: RePEc:cdl:uctcwp:qt9jn5r27v
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    Cited by:

    1. Mondschein, Andrew Samuel, 2012. "The Personal City: The Experimental, Cognitive Nature of Travel and Activity and Implications for Accessibility," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt67d5w48s, University of California Transportation Center.
    2. Kwan, Mei-Po & Golledge, Reginald G. & Speigle, Jon, 1996. "Information Representation for Driver Decision Support Systems," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt7zz0q3mw, University of California Transportation Center.
    3. Golledge, Reginald G & Zhou, Jack, 1999. "A GPS-based Analysis of Household Travel Behavior," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt3hg1f5nb, University of California Transportation Center.
    4. Kwan, Mei-Po & Golledge, Reginald G., 1996. "Computational Process Modeling of Disaggregate Travel Behavior," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt91f574zq, University of California Transportation Center.
    5. Jonathan L. Gifford, 2011. "Psychology and Rationality in User Behavior: The Case of Scarcity," Chapters,in: A Handbook of Transport Economics, chapter 27 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    6. Zhou, Jack & Golledge, Reginald, 1999. "A GPS-based Analysis Household Travel Behavior," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt3zf8h075, University of California Transportation Center.
    7. Golledge, Reginald G. & Zhou, Jianyu, 2001. "GPS-Based Tracking of Daily Activities," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt9jb438r2, University of California Transportation Center.
    8. Mondschein, Andrew Samuel, 2013. "The Personal City: The Experiential, Cognitive Nature of Travel and Activity and Implications for Accessibility," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt7014d9cg, University of California Transportation Center.
    9. Guo, Zhan, 2011. "Mind the map! The impact of transit maps on path choice in public transit," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 45(7), pages 625-639, August.

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    Keywords

    Social and Behavioral Sciences;

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