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Estimating the Effect of the Canadian Government's 2006-2007 Greenhouse Gas Policies

Author

Listed:
  • Mark Jaccard

    (Simon Fraser University)

  • Nic Rivers

    (Simon Fraser University)

Abstract

Mounting public concern about climate change has prompted the Canadian government to respond with a major policy effort to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Since early 2006, the Conservative government has launched a series of initiatives under its “ecoACTION” banner, culminating in the release in April 2007 of its “regulatory framework for air emissions,” which is currently under consultative review.

Suggested Citation

  • Mark Jaccard & Nic Rivers, 2007. "Estimating the Effect of the Canadian Government's 2006-2007 Greenhouse Gas Policies," e-briefs 46, C.D. Howe Institute.
  • Handle: RePEc:cdh:ebrief:46
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    File URL: https://www.cdhowe.org/public-policy-research/estimating-effect-canadian-government%E2%80%99s-2006-2007-greenhouse-gas-policies
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Roger A. Samson & Stephanie Bailey Stamler, 2009. "Going Green for Less: Cost-Effective Alternative Energy Sources," C.D. Howe Institute Commentary, C.D. Howe Institute, issue 282, February.
    2. Maciej Kotowski, 2007. "Insuring Canada’s Exports: The Case for Reform at Export Development Canada," C.D. Howe Institute Commentary, C.D. Howe Institute, issue 257, December.
    3. William B.P. Robson, 2007. "Time and Money: The Challenge of Demographic Change and Government Finances in Canada," C.D. Howe Institute Backgrounder, C.D. Howe Institute, issue 109, December.
    4. Doug Auld, 2008. "The Ethanol Trap: Why Policies to Promote Ethanol as Fuel Need Rethinking," C.D. Howe Institute Commentary, C.D. Howe Institute, issue 268, July.
    5. David Johnson, 2008. "School Grades: Identifying British Columbia's Best Schools," C.D. Howe Institute Commentary, C.D. Howe Institute, issue 258, February.
    6. John Richards, 2007. "Reducing Poverty: What has Worked, and What Should Come Next," C.D. Howe Institute Commentary, C.D. Howe Institute, issue 255, October.
    7. Yvan Guillemette & William B.P. Robson, 2007. "Realistic Expectations: Demographics and the Pursuit of Prosperity in Saskatchewan," C.D. Howe Institute Backgrounder, C.D. Howe Institute, issue 107, November.
    8. Charles Freedman & Clyde Goodlet, 2007. "Financial Stability: What It Is and Why It Matters," C.D. Howe Institute Commentary, C.D. Howe Institute, issue 256, November.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    economic growth; economic innovation;

    JEL classification:

    • Q5 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics
    • O1 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development

    Statistics

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