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The Dissemination of Scholarly Information: Old Approaches and New Possibilities

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  • Al-Ubaydli, O.
  • Pollock, R.

Abstract

Current methods of disseminating scholarly information focus on the use of journals who retain exclusive rights in the material they publish. Using a simple model we explore the reasons for the development of the traditional journal model, why it is no longer efficient and how it could be improved upon. One of our main aims is to go beyond the basic question of distribution (access) to that of filtering, i.e. the process of matching information with the scholars who want it. With the volume of information production ever growing - and attention ever more scarce - filtering is becoming crucial and digital technology offers the possibility of radical innovation in this area. In particular, distribution and filtering can be separated allowing filtering to be made open and decentralized. This would promises to deliver dramatic increases in transparency and efficiency as well as greatly increased innovation in related product, processes and services.

Suggested Citation

  • Al-Ubaydli, O. & Pollock, R., 2010. "The Dissemination of Scholarly Information: Old Approaches and New Possibilities," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1023, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
  • Handle: RePEc:cam:camdae:1023
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    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Filtering scholarly information
      by Economic Logician in Economic Logic on 2010-05-27 19:59:00

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Journal; Open Access; Scholarly Communication; Matching;

    JEL classification:

    • D02 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Institutions: Design, Formation, Operations, and Impact
    • L82 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Services - - - Entertainment; Media
    • D40 - Microeconomics - - Market Structure, Pricing, and Design - - - General
    • L30 - Industrial Organization - - Nonprofit Organizations and Public Enterprise - - - General

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    1. Economic Logic blog

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