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Using Neural Networks to Model Bounded Rationality in Interactive Decision-Making


  • Sgroi, D.


This paper considers the use of neural networks to model bounded rational behaviour. The underlying theory and use of neural networks is now a component of various forms of scientific enquiry, be it modelling artificial intelligence, developing better pattern recognition or solving complex optimization problems. This paper surveys the recent literature in economics on their use as a plausible model of learning by example, in which the focus is not on improving their ability to perform to the point of zero error, but rather examining the sorts of errors they make and comparing these with observed bounded rational behaviour.

Suggested Citation

  • Sgroi, D., 2003. "Using Neural Networks to Model Bounded Rationality in Interactive Decision-Making," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 0339, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
  • Handle: RePEc:cam:camdae:0339
    Note: IO, ET

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Paul Joskow & Jean Tirole, 2005. "Merchant Transmission Investment," Journal of Industrial Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 53(2), pages 233-264, June.
    2. Gilbert, Richard J., 1989. "Mobility barriers and the value of incumbency," Handbook of Industrial Organization,in: R. Schmalensee & R. Willig (ed.), Handbook of Industrial Organization, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 8, pages 475-535 Elsevier.
    3. Oren, Shmuel S. & Spiller, Pablo T. & Varaiya, Pravin & Wu, Felix, 1995. "Nodal prices and transmission rights: A critical appraisal," The Electricity Journal, Elsevier, vol. 8(3), pages 24-35, April.
    4. Richard Gilbert & Neuhoff, K. & Newbery, D., 2002. "Allocating Transmission to Mitigate Market Power in Electricity Networks," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 0225, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    5. Bushnell, James B. & Stoft, Steven E., 1997. "Improving private incentives for electric grid investment," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(1-2), pages 85-108, March.
    6. Chao, Hung-Po & Peck, Stephen, 1996. "A Market Mechanism for Electric Power Transmission," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 10(1), pages 25-59, July.
    7. Joshua Gans & Stephen King, 2003. "Access Holidays for Network Infrastructure Investment," Agenda - A Journal of Policy Analysis and Reform, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics, vol. 10(2), pages 163-178.
    8. Hogan, William W, 1992. "Contract Networks for Electric Power Transmission," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 4(3), pages 211-242, September.
    9. Bushnell, James & Stoft, Steven, 1996. "Grid investment: can a market do the job?," The Electricity Journal, Elsevier, vol. 9(1), pages 74-79.
    10. Hogan, William W., 2003. "Transmission Market Design," Working Paper Series rwp03-040, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
    11. Bushnell, James B & Stoft, Steven E, 1996. "Electric Grid Investment under a Contract Network Regime," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 10(1), pages 61-79, July.
    12. Joskow, Paul L & Tirole, Jean, 1999. "Transmission Rights and Market Power on Electric Power Networks I: Financial Rights," CEPR Discussion Papers 2093, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    13. Kattuman, P.A. & Green, R.J. & Bialek, J.W., 2001. "A Tracing Method for Pricing Inter-Area Electricity Trades," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 0107, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    14. Paul L. Joskow, 2003. "The Difficult Transition to Competitive Electricity Markets in the U.S," Working Papers 0308, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research.
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    Cited by:

    1. Jason Barr & Francesco Saraceno, 2005. "Modeling the Firm as an Artificial Neural Network," Working Papers Rutgers University, Newark 2005-011, Department of Economics, Rutgers University, Newark.
    2. Fioretti, Guido, 2006. "Recognising investment opportunities at the onset of recoveries," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(2), pages 69-84, June.

    More about this item


    neural networks; bounded rationality; learning; repeated games; industrial organization;

    JEL classification:

    • C72 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Noncooperative Games
    • D00 - Microeconomics - - General - - - General
    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness

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