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Black Market And Official Exchange Rates:Long-Run Equilibrium And Short-Run Dynamics


  • Guglielmo Maria Caporale


  • Mario Cerrato


This paper provides further empirical results on the relationship between black market and official exchange rates in six emerging economies (Iran, India, Indonesia, Korea, Pakistan, and Thailand). First, it applies both time series techniques and heterogeneous panel methods to test for the existence of a long-run relation between these two types of exchange rates. Second, it tests formally the validity of the proportionality restriction implying a constant black-market premium. Third, in addition to the long-run equilibrium, it also analyses the short-run dynamic responses of both markets to shocks. Evidence of market inefficiency and incomplete (or longlived) reversion to long-run equilibrium is found. This implies that financial managers can only partially reduce the exchange rate risk, whilst monetary authorities can effectively pursue their policy objectives by imposing foreign exchange or direct controls.

Suggested Citation

  • Guglielmo Maria Caporale & Mario Cerrato, 2005. "Black Market And Official Exchange Rates:Long-Run Equilibrium And Short-Run Dynamics," Economics and Finance Discussion Papers 05-04, Economics and Finance Section, School of Social Sciences, Brunel University.
  • Handle: RePEc:bru:bruedp:05-04

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    1. Booth, G. Geoffrey & Mustafa, Chowdhury, 1991. "Long-run dynamics of black and official exchange rates," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 10(3), pages 392-405, September.
    2. Chinn, Menzie D. & Ito, Hiro, 2006. "What matters for financial development? Capital controls, institutions, and interactions," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 81(1), pages 163-192, October.
    3. Kiguel, Miguel & O'Connell, Stephen A, 1995. "Parallel Exchange Rates in Developing Countries," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 10(1), pages 21-52, February.
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    6. Mario Cerrato & Nicholas Sarantis, 2007. "Does purchasing power parity hold in emerging markets? Evidence from a panel of black market exchange rates," International Journal of Finance & Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 12(4), pages 427-444.
    7. Kouretas, Georgios P. & Zarangas, Leonidas P., 2001. "Black and official exchange rates in Greece: an analysis of their long-run dynamics," Journal of Multinational Financial Management, Elsevier, vol. 11(3), pages 295-314, July.
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    11. Nita Ghei & Steven B. Kamin, 1996. "The use of the parallel market rate as a guide to setting the official exchange rate," International Finance Discussion Papers 564, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    12. Bahmani-Oskooee, Mohsen & Miteza, Ilir & Nasir, A. B. M., 2002. "The long-run relation between black market and official exchange rates: evidence from panel cointegration," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 76(3), pages 397-404, August.
    13. Taylor, Mark P. & Sarno, Lucio, 1998. "The behavior of real exchange rates during the post-Bretton Woods period," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(2), pages 281-312, December.
    14. Li, Hongyi & Maddala, G. S., 1997. "Bootstrapping cointegrating regressions," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 80(2), pages 297-318, October.
    15. Suzanne McCoskey & Chihwa Kao, 1998. "A residual-based test of the null of cointegration in panel data," Econometric Reviews, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(1), pages 57-84.
    16. Mario Cerrato & Neil Kellard & Nicholas Sarantis, 2008. "The Purchasing Power Parity Persistence Puzzle: Evidence From Black Market Real Exchange Rates," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 76(4), pages 405-423, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Pieters, Gina, 2016. "Does bitcoin reveal new information about exchange rates and financial integration?," Globalization and Monetary Policy Institute Working Paper 292, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas.
    2. repec:arp:ijefrr:2017:p:76-90 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Ferit Kula & Alper Aslan & Ýlhan Öztürk, 2014. "Long Run Tendencies and Short Run Adjustments Between Official and Black Market Exchange Rates in MENA Countries," International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues, Econjournals, vol. 4(3), pages 494-500.
    4. Yanping Zhao & Jakob Haan & Bert Scholtens & Haizhen Yang, 2014. "Sudden Stops and Currency Crashes," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 22(4), pages 660-685, September.
    5. Ricky Chee Jiun Chia & Shiok Ye Lim & Sheue Li Ong, 2014. "Long-Run Validity of Purchasing Power Parity and Cointegration Analysis for Low Income African Countries," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 34(3), pages 1438-1447.
    6. Albert Makochekanwa, 2007. "Zimbabwe’s Black Market for Foreign Exchange," Working Papers 200713, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.
    7. Huett, Hannes & Krapf, Matthias & Uysal, S. Derya, 2014. "Price dynamics in the Belarusian black market for foreign exchange," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 94(1), pages 169-176.
    8. Ahmad Zubaidi Baharumshah & Siti Hamizah Mohd & Siew-Voon Soon, 2011. "Purchasing Power Parity and Efficiency of Black Market Exchange Rate in African Countries," Emerging Markets Finance and Trade, M.E. Sharpe, Inc., vol. 47(5), pages 52-70, September.

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