IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/arx/papers/1505.02305.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

The Intrafirm Complexity of Systemically Important Financial Institutions

Author

Listed:
  • Robin L. Lumsdaine
  • Daniel N. Rockmore
  • Nicholas Foti
  • Gregory Leibon
  • J. Doyne Farmer

Abstract

In November, 2011, the Financial Stability Board, in collaboration with the International Monetary Fund, published a list of 29 "systemically important financial institutions" (SIFIs). This designation reflects a concern that the failure of any one of them could have dramatic negative consequences for the global economy and is based on "their size, complexity, and systemic interconnectedness". While the characteristics of "size" and "systemic interconnectedness" have been the subject of a good deal of quantitative analysis, less attention has been paid to measures of a firm's "complexity." In this paper we take on the challenges of measuring the complexity of a financial institution and to that end explore the use of the structure of an individual firm's control hierarchy as a proxy for institutional complexity. The control hierarchy is a network representation of the institution and its subsidiaries. We show that this mathematical representation (and various associated metrics) provides a consistent way to compare the complexity of firms with often very disparate business models and as such may provide the foundation for determining a SIFI designation. By quantifying the level of complexity of a firm, our approach also may prove useful should firms need to reduce their level of complexity either in response to business or regulatory needs. Using a data set containing the control hierarchies of many of the designated SIFIs, we find that in the past two years, these firms have decreased their level of complexity, perhaps in response to regulatory requirements.

Suggested Citation

  • Robin L. Lumsdaine & Daniel N. Rockmore & Nicholas Foti & Gregory Leibon & J. Doyne Farmer, 2015. "The Intrafirm Complexity of Systemically Important Financial Institutions," Papers 1505.02305, arXiv.org.
  • Handle: RePEc:arx:papers:1505.02305
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://arxiv.org/pdf/1505.02305
    File Function: Latest version
    Download Restriction: no

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Mark D. Flood & Dror Y. Kenett & Robin L. Lumsdaine & Jonathan K. Simon, 2017. "The Complexity of Bank Holding Companies: A Topological Approach," NBER Working Papers 23755, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Mark D. Flood & Dror Y. Kenett & Robin L. Lumsdaine & Jonathan J. Simon, 2017. "The Complexity of Bank Holding Companies: A New Measurement Approach," Working Papers 17-03, Office of Financial Research, US Department of the Treasury.

    More about this item

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:arx:papers:1505.02305. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (arXiv administrators). General contact details of provider: http://arxiv.org/ .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.