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Trading activity and price impact in parallel markets: SETS vs. off-book market at the London Stock Exchange

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  • Angelo Carollo
  • Gabriella Vaglica
  • Fabrizio Lillo
  • Rosario N. Mantegna

Abstract

We empirically study the trading activity in the electronic on-book segment and in the dealership off-book segment of the London Stock Exchange, investigating separately the trading of active market members and of other market participants which are non-members. We find that (i) the volume distribution of off-book transactions has a significantly fatter tail than the one of on-book transactions, (ii) groups of members and non-members can be classified in categories according to their trading profile (iii) there is a strong anticorrelation between the daily inventory variation of a market member due to the on-book market transactions and inventory variation due to the off-book market transactions with non-members, and (iv) the autocorrelation of the sign of the orders of non-members in the off-book market is slowly decaying. We also analyze the on-book price impact function over time, both for positive and negative lags, of the electronic trades and of the off-book trades. The unconditional impact curves are very different for the electronic trades and the off-book trades. Moreover there is a small dependence of impact on the volume for the on-book electronic trades, while the shape and magnitude of impact function of off-book transactions strongly depend on volume.

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  • Angelo Carollo & Gabriella Vaglica & Fabrizio Lillo & Rosario N. Mantegna, 2011. "Trading activity and price impact in parallel markets: SETS vs. off-book market at the London Stock Exchange," Papers 1102.0687, arXiv.org.
  • Handle: RePEc:arx:papers:1102.0687
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Federico Musciotto & Luca Marotta & Salvatore Miccich`e & Jyrki Piilo & Rosario N. Mantegna, 2015. "Patterns of trading profiles at the Nordic Stock Exchange. A correlation-based approach," Papers 1511.06873, arXiv.org.
    2. Michele Tumminello & Fabrizio Lillo & Jyrki Piilo & Rosario N. Mantegna, 2011. "Identification of clusters of investors from their real trading activity in a financial market," Papers 1107.3942, arXiv.org.

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