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Salvaging the Kyoto Climate Change Negotiations

Author

Listed:
  • Warwick J. McKibbin

    () (Australian National University, Research School of Pacific and Asian Studies, Economics Division
    The Brookings Institution)

  • Peter J. Wilcoxen

    (University of Texas, Economics Department
    The Brookings Institution)

Abstract

The third Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change will be held in Kyoto in early December. These upcoming negotiations, aimed at reducing future emissions of greenhouse gases, are almost certain to accomplish nothing. Failure is likely because the negotiations are focused on achieving rigid targets and timetables for emissions reductions in spite of the enormous uncertainties surrounding climate change. Even at this late hour, however, the conference could be salvaged. If negotiations could be shifted toward more flexible policies, such as a system of national permits and emissions fees or a reduction in world coal subsidies, the conference could mark the turning point at which climate negotiations evolve from unrealistic posturing toward a realistic framework for slowing carbon emissions

Suggested Citation

  • Warwick J. McKibbin & Peter J. Wilcoxen, 1997. "Salvaging the Kyoto Climate Change Negotiations," Economics and Environment Network Working Papers 9704, Australian National University, Economics and Environment Network.
  • Handle: RePEc:anu:eenwps:9704
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    File URL: http://www.brook.edu/dybdocroot/comm/policybriefs/pb027/pb27.htm
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Lehmann, Paul, 2008. "Using a Policy Mix for Pollution Control – A Review of Economic Literature," MPRA Paper 21354, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Warwick J. McKibbin & Peter J. Wilcoxen, 1998. "Global Emissions Trading: Prospects and Pitfalls," Economics and Environment Network Working Papers 9801, Australian National University, Economics and Environment Network.
    3. Warwick J. McKibbin, 1998. "The McKibbin-Wilcoxen Proposal for Global Greenhouse Abatement," Economics and Environment Network Working Papers 9802, Australian National University, Economics and Environment Network.
    4. John Pezzey, 2003. "Emission Taxes and Tradeable Permits A Comparison of Views on Long-Run Efficiency," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 26(2), pages 329-342, October.
    5. Victor, David G. & House, Joshua C., 2006. "BP's emissions trading system," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(15), pages 2100-2112, October.
    6. Toman, Michael & Morgenstern, Richard & Anderson, John, 1998. "The Economics of "When" Flexibility in the Design of Greenhouse Gas Abatement Policies," Discussion Papers dp-99-38-rev, Resources For the Future.
    7. Marco Grasso, 2004. "Climate change: the global public good," Working Papers 75, University of Milano-Bicocca, Department of Economics, revised May 2004.
    8. Warwick J. McKibbin, 1998. "International Permit Trading: Creating a Sustainable System," Economics and Environment Network Working Papers 9803, Australian National University, Economics and Environment Network.
    9. Warwick J. McKibbin & Peter J. Wilcoxen, 2002. "The Role of Economics in Climate Change Policy," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 16(2), pages 107-129, Spring.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    climate change; emission permits; greenhouse gases; policy;

    JEL classification:

    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming
    • Q58 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environmental Economics: Government Policy
    • O20 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Development Planning and Policy - - - General

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