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Demand Patterns and Employment Growth, Consumption and Services in France, Germany, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom and the United States




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  • Ronald Schettkat & Wiemer Salverda, 2004. "Demand Patterns and Employment Growth, Consumption and Services in France, Germany, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom and the United States," DEMPATEM Working Papers wp13, AIAS, Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Labour Studies.
  • Handle: RePEc:aia:dempat:wp13

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Schettkat, Ronald, 2002. "Differences in US-German time-allocation: Why do Americans work longer hours than Germans?," Discussion Papers, Research Unit: Labor Market Policy and Employment FS I 02-212, Social Science Research Center Berlin (WZB).
    2. Freeman, Richard B & Schettkat, Ronald, 2001. " Marketization of Production and the US-Europe Employment Gap," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 63(0), pages 647-670, Special I.
    3. Martin Neil Baily & Robert M. Solow, 2001. "International Productivity Comparisons Built from the Firm Level," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 15(3), pages 151-172, Summer.
    4. repec:ucp:bknber:9780226304557 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Mary Gregory & Giovanni Russo, 2004. "The Employment Impact of Differences in Dmand and Production," DEMPATEM Working Papers wp10, AIAS, Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Labour Studies.
    6. Falvey, Rodney E & Gemmell, Norman, 1996. "Are Services Income-Elastic? Some New Evidence," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 42(3), pages 257-269, September.
    7. Michael J. Boskin, 1998. "Consumer Prices, the Consumer Price Index, and the Cost of Living," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 12(1), pages 3-26, Winter.
    8. Giersch, Herbert & Wolter, Frank, 1983. "Towards an Explanation of the Productivity Slowdown: An Acceleration-Deceleration Hypothesis," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 93(369), pages 35-55, March.
    9. Vincent Duwicquet & Jacques Mazier & Pascal Petit & Jamel Saadaoui, 2015. "The Future of the Euro," Post-Print hal-01399157, HAL.
    10. John Schmitt, 2004. "Estimating household consumption expenditures in the United States using the Interview and Diary portions of the 1980, 1990, and 1997 Consumer Expenditure Surveys," DEMPATEM Working Papers wp1, AIAS, Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Labour Studies.
    11. Hicks, J. R., 1986. "A Revision of Demand Theory," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198285502, June.
    12. Kevin J. Stiroh, 2002. "Information Technology and the U.S. Productivity Revival: What Do the Industry Data Say?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(5), pages 1559-1576, December.
    13. Freeman, Richard B., 1998. "War of the models: Which labour market institutions for the 21st century?1," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 5(1), pages 1-24, March.
    14. Eileen Appelbaum & Ronald Schettkat, 1999. "Are Prices Unimportant? The Changing Structure of the Industrialized Economies," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 21(3), pages 387-398, March.
    15. Katharine G. Abraham & John S. Greenlees & Brent R. Moulton, 1998. "Working to Improve the Consumer Price Index," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 12(1), pages 27-36, Winter.
    16. Andrew Sharpe, 2000. "The Productivity Renaissance in the U.S. Service Sector," International Productivity Monitor, Centre for the Study of Living Standards, vol. 1, pages 6-8, Fall.
    17. E. Roy Weintraub, 1992. "Introduction," History of Political Economy, Duke University Press, vol. 24(5), pages 3-12, Supplemen.
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    Cited by:

    1. Lührmann, Melanie & Weiss, Matthias, 2010. "The effect of working time and labor force participation on unemployment: A new argument in an old debate," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 27(1), pages 67-82, January.
    2. Melanie Lührmann & Matthias Weiss, 2006. "Market Work, Home Production, Consumer Demand and Unemployment among the Unskilled," MEA discussion paper series 06101, Munich Center for the Economics of Aging (MEA) at the Max Planck Institute for Social Law and Social Policy.

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