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Endangerment and Likeability of Wildlife Species: How Important are they for Proposed Payments for Conservation

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  • Tisdell, Clement A.
  • Swarna Nantha, Hemanath
  • Wilson, Clevo

Abstract

Examines empirically the relative influence of the degree of endangerment of wildlife species and their stated likeability on individuals’ willingness to pay (WTP) for their conservation. To do this, it utilises data obtained from the IUCN Red List and likeability and WTP data obtained from two serial surveys of a sample of the Australian public who were requested to assess 24 Australian wildlife species in each of three animal classes: mammals, birds and reptiles. Between the first and second survey, respondents were provided with extra information about the focal species. This information resulted in the clear dominance of endangerment as the major influence on the WTP of respondents for the conservation of the focal wildlife species. Our results throw doubts on the proposition in the literature that the likeability of species is the dominant influence on WTP for conservation of wildlife species. Furthermore, our results suggest that the relationship between WTP for the conservation of wildlife in relation to their population levels may be more complex and different to that suggested in some of the literature on ecological economics.

Suggested Citation

  • Tisdell, Clement A. & Swarna Nantha, Hemanath & Wilson, Clevo, 2004. "Endangerment and Likeability of Wildlife Species: How Important are they for Proposed Payments for Conservation," Economics, Ecology and Environment Working Papers 51419, University of Queensland, School of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:uqseee:51419
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/51419
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Tisdell, Clement A. & Wilson, Clevo & Swarna Nantha, Hemanath, 2004. "Comparative Public Support for Conserving Reptile Species is High: Australian Evidence and its Implications," Economics, Ecology and Environment Working Papers 51412, University of Queensland, School of Economics.
    2. Andrew Metrick & Martin L. Weitzman, 1996. "Patterns of Behavior in Endangered Species Preservation," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 72(1), pages 1-16.
    3. Andrew Metrick & Martin L. Weitzman, 1998. "Conflicts and Choices in Biodiversity Preservation," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 12(3), pages 21-34, Summer.
    4. Tisdell, Clement A. & Wilson, Clevo, 2004. "Information and Wildlife Valuation: Experiments and Policy," Economics, Ecology and Environment Working Papers 51409, University of Queensland, School of Economics.
    5. Bandara, Ranjith & Tisdell, Clement A., 2004. "Effects of a Change in Abundance of Elephants on Willingness to Pay for their Conservation," Economics, Ecology and Environment Working Papers 48979, University of Queensland, School of Economics.
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    Cited by:

    1. Tisdell, Clement A. & Swarna Nantha, Hemanath, 2005. "Comparison of Funding and Demand for the Conservation of the Charismatic Koala with those for the Critically Endangered Wombat Lasiorhinus krefftii," Economics, Ecology and Environment Working Papers 55067, University of Queensland, School of Economics.

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