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Identifying Market Preferences for High Selenium Beef

Listed author(s):
  • Hovde, Scott C.
  • Wachenheim, Cheryl J.
  • Hearne, Robert R.
  • Nganje, William E.

Selenium is an element found in relatively high concentrations in crops and livestock raised on high-selenium soils located in North and South Dakota. Evidence suggests that a high-selenium diet such as would be obtained from consuming these products can reduce the risk of certain cancers. The region's livestock and grain producers are exploring potential high-selenium product marketing opportunities. A choice experiment was conducted to identify preferred attributes for a high-selenium beef product and the characteristics of potential market segments. In a national survey, participants chose between different levels of health claim approval and research, prices, and selenium origin. A multinomial logit regression model was estimated. Labeling reflecting scientific support linking selenium and reduced cancer risk, and natural-source selenium was ineffective. Marketing opportunities identified are consistent with existing functional food market segments and include consumers with higher income and education, 45 to 55 years of age, and with children.

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File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/7633
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Paper provided by North Dakota State University, Department of Agribusiness and Applied Economics in its series Agribusiness & Applied Economics Report with number 7633.

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Date of creation: 2007
Handle: RePEc:ags:nddaae:7633
Contact details of provider: Postal:
PO Box 5636, Fargo, ND 58105-5636

Phone: (701) 231-7441
Web page: http://www.ext.nodak.edu/homepages/aedept/
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  1. Leigh J. Maynard & Sharon T. Franklin, 2003. "Functional Foods as a Value-Added Strategy: The Commercial Potential of “Cancer-Fighting” Dairy Products," Review of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 25(2), pages 316-331.
  2. Silva, Andres & Nayga, Rodolfo M., Jr. & Campbell, Benjamin L. & Park, John L., 2007. "On the Use of Valuation Mechanisms to Measure Consumers' Willingness to Pay for Novel Products: A Comparison of Hypothetical and Non-Hypothetical Values," International Food and Agribusiness Management Review, International Food and Agribusiness Management Association (IFAMA), vol. 10(02).
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  7. Lusk, Jayson L. & Jamal, Mustafa & Kurlander, Lauren & Roucan, Maud & Taulman, Lesley, 2005. "A Meta-Analysis of Genetically Modified Food Valuation Studies," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 30(01), April.
  8. Olynk, Nicole J. & Tonsor, Glynn T. & Wolf, Christopher A., 2010. "Consumer Willingness to Pay for Livestock Credence Attribute Claim Verification," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 35(2), August.
  9. He, Senhui & Fletcher, Stanley M. & Rimal, Arbindra, 2005. "Unwillingness to Consume Irradiated Beef and Unwillingness to Pay for Beef Irradiation," Journal of Food Distribution Research, Food Distribution Research Society, vol. 36(01), March.
  10. Kelvin J. Lancaster, 1966. "A New Approach to Consumer Theory," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 74, pages 132-132.
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