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Causes of Efficiency Change in Transition: Theory and Cross-Country Survey Evidence from Agriculture

  • Vranken, Liesbet
  • Swinnen, Johan F.M.

Studies on efficiency changes in transition agriculture yield mixed results. This paper develops both a theoretical model and an empirical analysis of how distribution of efficiency scores changes with the various stages of transition. We use a unique set of representative farm survey data to calculate farm level efficiency scores, compare the efficiency distributions of different transition countries and correlate these with various indicators of particular reforms. Our study indicates that, in particular, general institutional reforms and reforms focused on market institutions and on reducing market imperfections in input and output markets have an important positive impact on farm efficiency.

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Paper provided by European Association of Agricultural Economists in its series 103rd Seminar, April 23-25, 2007, Barcelona, Spain with number 9442.

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Date of creation: 2007
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Handle: RePEc:ags:eaa103:9442
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  1. Karen Macours & Johan F. M. Swinnen, 2000. "Impact of Initial Conditions and Reform Policies on Agricultural Performance in Central and Eastern Europe, the Former Soviet Union, and East Asia," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 82(5), pages 1149-1155.
  2. Charnes, A. & Cooper, W. W. & Rhodes, E., 1978. "Measuring the efficiency of decision making units," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 2(6), pages 429-444, November.
  3. Karen Macours & Johan F. M. Swinnen, 2005. "Agricultural Labor Adjustments in Transition Countries: The Role of Migration and Impact on Poverty ," Review of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 27(3), pages 405-411.
  4. Paul Wilson & Dave Hadley & Stephen Ramsden & Ioannis Kaltsas, 1998. "Measuring and Explaining Technical Efficiency in UK Potato Production," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 49(3), pages 294-305.
  5. Rizov, Marian & Swinnen, Johan F.M., 2004. "Human capital, market imperfections, and labor reallocation in transition," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(4), pages 745-774, December.
  6. Sedik, David & Trueblood, Michael & Arnade, Carlos, 1999. "Corporate Farm Performance in Russia, 1991-1995: An Efficiency Analysis," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(3), pages 514-533, September.
  7. Johan F. M. Swinnen & Liesbeth Dries & Karen Macours, 2005. "Transition and agricultural labor," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 32(1), pages 15-34, 01.
  8. Erik Mathijs & Liesbet Vranken, 2001. "Human Capital, Gender and Organisation in Transition Agriculture: Measuring and Explaining the Technical Efficiency of Bulgarian and Hungarian Farms," Post-Communist Economies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(2), pages 171-187.
  9. Erik Mathijs & Johan F. M. Swinnen, 2001. "Production Organization And Efficiency During Transition: An Empirical Analysis Of East German Agriculture," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 83(1), pages 100-107, February.
  10. Pingali, Prabhu L & Xuan, Vo-Tong, 1992. "Vietnam: Decollectivization and Rice Productivity Growth," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 40(4), pages 697-718, July.
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