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The Impact of Price-Induced Hedging Behavior on Commodity Market Volatility

Author

Listed:
  • Kauffman, Nathan S.
  • Hayes, Dermot J.

Abstract

The utility maximization problem of a grain producer is formulated and solved numerically under prospect theory as an alternative to expected utility theory. Conventional theory posits that the optimal hedging position of a producer is not affected solely due to changes in the level of futures prices. However, a strong degree of positive correlation is apparent in the data. Our results show that with prospect theory serving as the underlying behavioral framework, the optimal hedge of a producer is affected by changes in futures price levels. The implications of this price-induced hedging behavior on spot prices and volatility are subsequently considered.

Suggested Citation

  • Kauffman, Nathan S. & Hayes, Dermot J., 2011. "The Impact of Price-Induced Hedging Behavior on Commodity Market Volatility," 2011 Annual Meeting, July 24-26, 2011, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 103242, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea11:103242
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/103242
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    Cited by:

    1. Choe, Chongwoo & Lien, Donald & Yu, Chia-Feng (Jeffrey), 2015. "Optimal managerial hedging and contracting with self-esteem concerns," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 354-367.
    2. Jacobs, Keri & Li, Ziran & Hayes, Dermot, 2016. "Price responses in forward contracting: do we limit the upside and expose the downside?," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, 2016, Boston, Massachusetts 235539, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    futures markets; hedging; prospect theory; risk preferences; Agribusiness; Institutional and Behavioral Economics; Risk and Uncertainty; D03; D81; G11; Q13;

    JEL classification:

    • D03 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Behavioral Microeconomics: Underlying Principles
    • D81 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Criteria for Decision-Making under Risk and Uncertainty
    • G11 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Portfolio Choice; Investment Decisions
    • Q13 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agricultural Markets and Marketing; Cooperatives; Agribusiness

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