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University-Industry Relationships And The Design Of Biotechnology Research

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  • Yang, Hui
  • Buccola, Steven T.

Abstract

The central objective of the present paper is to examine how university bioscientists select their research agendas, with special attention to biotechnology firms' influence on those agendas. Among other issues, we will assess UIRs' potential effects on the private appropriability of the characteristics of bioengineered crop and animal varieties, and on the basicness and breadth of a scientist's research. Factors that potentially would affect scientists' research agenda include the university's size, reputation, resources, culture, and total government funding; the scientist's academic position and communication network; and the market power, cultures, and specialties of the biotech firms with which the university has research relationships. An electronic survey of academic life scientists, concentrating on their research objectives, funding sources, collaborators, contracts, and budgets, will form much of the data for testing these models.

Suggested Citation

  • Yang, Hui & Buccola, Steven T., 2003. "University-Industry Relationships And The Design Of Biotechnology Research," 2003 Annual meeting, July 27-30, Montreal, Canada 21985, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea03:21985
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Mansfield, Edwin, 1992. "Academic research and industrial innovation: A further note," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 21(3), pages 295-296, June.
    2. Bronwyn H. Hall & Albert N. Link & John T. Scott, 2003. "Universities as Research Partners," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, pages 485-491.
    3. Mansfield, Edwin, 1998. "Academic research and industrial innovation: An update of empirical findings1," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 26(7-8), pages 773-776, April.
    4. Mansfield, Edwin, 1991. "Academic research and industrial innovation," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 20(1), pages 1-12, February.
    5. Wallace E. Huffman, 2001. "Public-Private Research and Development Relationship: Disscussion," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 83(3), pages 754-757.
    6. Narin, Francis & Hamilton, Kimberly S. & Olivastro, Dominic, 1997. "The increasing linkage between U.S. technology and public science," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 26(3), pages 317-330, October.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies; O31; O32; O33;

    JEL classification:

    • O31 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Innovation and Invention: Processes and Incentives
    • O32 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Management of Technological Innovation and R&D
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes

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