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Why do empirical tests tend to accept the NEG? An alternative approach to the 'wage equation' in European regions

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  • Fernando Bruna

    () (University of A Coruña, Economics and Business Department)

Abstract

This paper posits a new approach to the ‘wage equation’ of the New Economic Geography (NEG) stressing the uncertain interpretation of its empirical results. It emphasizes the generality of the variable to be explained, marginal costs. Then, two artificial (noNEG) tests are proposed in order to identify the statistical features explaining why wagetype equations tend to be accepted in tests for European data. The estimation results are shown to be similar not only when Market Potential is built for variables that do not measure market size but also when the focus of attention changes from global to local spatial patterns.

Suggested Citation

  • Fernando Bruna, 2015. "Why do empirical tests tend to accept the NEG? An alternative approach to the 'wage equation' in European regions," Working Papers 15-11, Asociación Española de Economía y Finanzas Internacionales.
  • Handle: RePEc:aee:wpaper:1511
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Steven Brakman & Harry Garretsen & Charles van Marrewijk, 2009. "Economic Geography Within And Between European Nations: The Role Of Market Potential And Density Across Space And Time," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 49(4), pages 777-800.
    2. Hervé Boulhol & Alain de Serres, 2010. "Have developed countries escaped the curse of distance?," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 10(1), pages 113-139, January.
    3. Kristian Behrens & Carl Gaigné & Gianmarco I.P. Ottaviano & Jacques-François Thisse, 2006. "Is remoteness a locational disadvantage?," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 6(3), pages 347-368, June.
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    5. Head, Keith & Mayer, Thierry, 2006. "Regional wage and employment responses to market potential in the EU," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(5), pages 573-594, September.
    6. Bernard Fingleton & Manfred Fischer, 2010. "Neoclassical theory versus new economic geography: competing explanations of cross-regional variation in economic development," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 44(3), pages 467-491, June.
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    12. Fingleton, Bernard, 2008. "Competing models of global dynamics: Evidence from panel models with spatially correlated error components," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 25(3), pages 542-558, May.
    13. Gabriel Ahlfeldt & Arne Feddersen, 2008. "Determinants of Spatial Weights in Spatial Wage Equations: A Sensitivity Analysis within a Consistent Framework," Working Papers 022, Chair for Economic Policy, University of Hamburg.
    14. Keith Head & Thierry Mayer, 2011. "Gravity, market potential and economic development," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 11(2), pages 281-294, March.
    15. Reinhold Kosfeld & Hans-Friedrich Eckey, 2010. "Market access, regional price level and wage disparities: the German case," Review of Regional Research: Jahrbuch für Regionalwissenschaft, Springer;Gesellschaft für Regionalforschung (GfR), vol. 30(2), pages 105-128, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Fichet de Clairfontaine, Aurélien & Hammer, Christoph, 2016. "Trade Costs and Income in European Regions: Evidence from a regional bilateral trade dataset," Department of Economics Working Paper Series 4887, WU Vienna University of Economics and Business.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    New Economic Geography; wage equation; Market Potential; spillovers; global trend; spatial autocorrelation;

    JEL classification:

    • C21 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models
    • F12 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Models of Trade with Imperfect Competition and Scale Economies; Fragmentation
    • R12 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Size and Spatial Distributions of Regional Economic Activity; Interregional Trade (economic geography)

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