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Money, Capital And Exchange Rate Fluctuations


  • Pedro Gomis-Porqueras
  • Timothy Kam


  • Junsang Lee


We explore how the informational frictions underlying monetary exchange affect international exchange rate dynamics. Using a two-country, two-sector model, we show that information frictions imply a particular restriction on domestic price dynamics and hence on international nominal and real exchange rate determination. Furthermore, if capital is utilized as a factor of production in both production sectors, then there is a further restriction on asset pricing relations (money and capital). As a result, monetary and real outcomes become interdependent in the model. Our perfectly flexible price model is capable of producing endogenously rigid international relative prices in response to technology and monetary shocks. The model is capable of accounting for the empirical regularities that the real and nominal exchange rates are more volatile than U.S. output, and that the two are positively and perfectly correlated. The model is also consistent with other standard real business cycle facts for the U.S.

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  • Pedro Gomis-Porqueras & Timothy Kam & Junsang Lee, 2010. "Money, Capital And Exchange Rate Fluctuations," ANU Working Papers in Economics and Econometrics 2010-534, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:acb:cbeeco:2010-534

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    Cited by:

    1. Timothy Kam & Pere Gomis-Porqueras & Christopher J. Waller, 2013. "Breaking the Kareken and Wallace Indeterminacy Result," ANU Working Papers in Economics and Econometrics 2013-613, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics.
    2. Yao, Wenying & Kam, Timothy & Vahid, Farshid, 2014. "VAR(MA), what is it good for? more bad news for reduced-form estimation and inference," Working Papers 2014-14, University of Tasmania, Tasmanian School of Business and Economics.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E43 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Interest Rates: Determination, Term Structure, and Effects
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy


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