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Macroeconomic policies of the Economic and Monetary Union: theoretical underpinnings and challenges

In: Neo-Liberal Economic Policy

Listed author(s):
  • Philip Arestis
  • Malcolm Sawyer

Over the past two decades there has been a prevailing shift in economic policy in many countries. This reflects the continuing rise of neo-liberalism – the doctrine that economic policy should ‘leave it to the market’ and that governments should retreat from market intervention. This book provides a balanced and comprehensive appraisal of these important policy developments. The authors examine the most notable trends in neo-liberal economic policy such as the withdrawal from the use of fiscal measures and the reliance on monetary policy. They discuss the neo-liberal view that the causes of unemployment lie in the operation of the labour market, in particular its inflexibility. They also assess the increasing inclination towards the liberalisation and deregulation of markets, most notably financial markets.

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This chapter was published in:
  • Philip Arestis & Malcolm Sawyer (ed.), 2004. "Neo-Liberal Economic Policy," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 3393.
  • This item is provided by Edward Elgar Publishing in its series Chapters with number 3393_7.
    Handle: RePEc:elg:eechap:3393_7
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    1. Kenneth Rogoff, 1985. "The Optimal Degree of Commitment to an Intermediate Monetary Target," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 100(4), pages 1169-1189.
    2. Laurence M. Ball & Niamh Sheridan, 2004. "Does Inflation Targeting Matter?," NBER Chapters,in: The Inflation-Targeting Debate, pages 249-282 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Philip Arestis & Malcolm Sawyer, 2006. "The nature and role of monetary policy when money is endogenous," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 30(6), pages 847-860, November.
    4. Atish Ghosh & Steven Phillips, 1998. "Warning: Inflation May Be Harmful to Your Growth," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 45(4), pages 672-710, December.
    5. Marco BUTI & Daniele FRANCO & Hedwig ONGENA, 1997. "Budgeetary Policies during Recessions : Retrospective Application of the Stability and Growth Pact” to the Post-War Period," Discussion Papers (REL - Recherches Economiques de Louvain) 1997041, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).
    6. James Forder, 2004. "The theory of credibility: confusions, limitations and dangers," Chapters,in: Neo-Liberal Economic Policy, chapter 2 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    7. James Forder, 2004. "Central bank independence: economic theory, evidence and political legitimacy," Chapters,in: The Rise of the Market, chapter 6 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    8. Ellen E. Meade & Nathan Sheets, 2002. "Regional influences on U.S. monetary policy: some implications for Europe," International Finance Discussion Papers 721, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    9. Dean Baker & Andrew Glyn & David Howell & John Schmitt, 2002. "Labor Market Institutions and Unemployment: A Critical Assessment of the Cross-Country Evidence," SCEPA working paper series. SCEPA's main areas of research are macroeconomic policy, inequality and poverty, and globalization. 2002-17, Schwartz Center for Economic Policy Analysis (SCEPA), The New School.
    10. Kenneth N. Kuttner & Patricia C. Mosser, 2002. "The monetary transmission mechanism: some answers and further questions," Economic Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, issue May, pages 15-26.
    11. Buiter, Willem H. & Corsetti, Giancarlo & Roubini, Nouriel, 1992. "`Excessive Deficits': Sense and Nonsense in the Treaty of Maastricht," CEPR Discussion Papers 750, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    12. Willem F. Duisenberg, 1999. "Economic and monetary union in Europe : the challenges ahead," Proceedings - Economic Policy Symposium - Jackson Hole, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, pages 185-194.
    13. Fertig, Michael & Schmidt, Christoph M., 2002. "Mobility within Europe – What do we (still not) know?," IZA Discussion Papers 447, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    14. Nordhaus, William D, 1973. "The Effects of Inflation on the Distribution of Economic Welfare," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 5(1), pages 465-504, Part II F.
    15. Kydland, Finn E & Prescott, Edward C, 1977. "Rules Rather Than Discretion: The Inconsistency of Optimal Plans," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 85(3), pages 473-491, June.
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