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Chris Vickers

Personal Details

First Name:Chris
Middle Name:
Last Name:Vickers
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pvi300
http://www.cla.auburn.edu/economics/directory/professorial-faculty/Chris-Vickers/

Affiliation

Department of Economics
Auburn University

Auburn, Alabama (United States)
http://cla.auburn.edu/economics/

: (334) 844-4910
(334) 844-4615
0326 Haley Center, Auburn University, AL 36849-5049
RePEc:edi:deaubus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Articles Chapters

Articles

  1. Vickers, Chris, 2016. "Socioeconomic status and judicial disparities in England and Wales, 1870–1910," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 32-53.
  2. T. Randolph Beard & Jeffrey Thomas Macher & Chris Vickers, 2016. "This Time is Different (?): Telecommunications Unbundling and Lessons for Railroad Regulation," Review of Industrial Organization, Springer;The Industrial Organization Society, vol. 49(2), pages 289-310, September.
  3. Chris Vickers & Nicolas L. Ziebarth, 2016. "Economic Development and the Demographics of Criminals in Victorian England," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 59(1), pages 191-223.
  4. Joel Mokyr & Chris Vickers & Nicolas L. Ziebarth, 2015. "The History of Technological Anxiety and the Future of Economic Growth: Is This Time Different?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 29(3), pages 31-50, Summer.
  5. Vickers, Chris & Ziebarth, Nicolas L., 2014. "Did the National Industrial Recovery Act Foster Collusion? Evidence from the Macaroni Industry," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 74(03), pages 831-862, September.
  6. Chicu, Mark & Vickers, Chris & Ziebarth, Nicolas L., 2013. "Cementing the case for collusion under the National Recovery Administration," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 50(4), pages 487-507.

Chapters

  1. Mark Chicu & Chris Vickers & Nicolas L. Ziebarth, 2012. "Cementing the Case for Collusion under the National Recovery Administration," NBER Chapters,in: The Microeconomics of New Deal Policy National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Articles

  1. Chris Vickers & Nicolas L. Ziebarth, 2016. "Economic Development and the Demographics of Criminals in Victorian England," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 59(1), pages 191-223.

    Cited by:

    1. Bindler, Anna & Hjalmarsson, Randi, 2017. "Prisons, recidivism and the age–crime profile," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 152(C), pages 46-49.
    2. Bindler, Anna & Hjalmarsson, Randi, 2016. "The Fall of Capital Punishment and the Rise of Prisons: How Punishment Severity Affects Jury Verdicts," Working Papers in Economics 674, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
    3. Joel Mokyr, 2014. "A Flourishing Economist: A Review Essay on Edmund Phelps's Mass Flourishing: How Grassroots Innovation Created Jobs, Challenge, and Change," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 52(1), pages 189-196, March.
    4. Joel Mokyr & Chris Vickers & Nicolas L. Ziebarth, 2015. "The History of Technological Anxiety and the Future of Economic Growth: Is This Time Different?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 29(3), pages 31-50, Summer.

  2. Joel Mokyr & Chris Vickers & Nicolas L. Ziebarth, 2015. "The History of Technological Anxiety and the Future of Economic Growth: Is This Time Different?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 29(3), pages 31-50, Summer.

    Cited by:

    1. Ugur, Mehmet & Awaworyi, Sefa & Solomon, Edna, 2016. "Technological innovation and employment in derived labour demand models: A hierarchical meta-regression analysis," MPRA Paper 73557, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Michael Peneder & Julia Bock-Schappelwein & Matthias Firgo & Oliver Fritz & Gerhard Streicher, 2017. "Economic Effects of Digitalisation in Austria," WIFO Monatsberichte (monthly reports), WIFO, vol. 90(3), pages 177-192, March.
    3. Roger Fouquet, 2017. "Consumer surplus from energy transitions," GRI Working Papers 277, Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment.
    4. John P. Martin, 2017. "Policies to Expand Digital Skills for the Machine Age," Working Papers id:11688, eSocialSciences.
    5. Gunther Tichy, 2016. "Is the Working Society Running Out of Jobs?," WIFO Monatsberichte (monthly reports), WIFO, vol. 89(12), pages 853-871, December.
    6. Gilbert Cette & John Fernald & Benoît Mojon, 2016. "The pre-Great Recession slowdown in productivity," Post-Print hal-01725475, HAL.
    7. Walter Buhr, 2018. "Institutional Economics: A Sketch of Economic Growth Policy," Volkswirtschaftliche Diskussionsbeiträge 183-18, Universität Siegen, Fakultät Wirtschaftswissenschaften, Wirtschaftsinformatik und Wirtschaftsrecht.
    8. Eckhardt Bode & Stephan Brunow & Ingrid Ott & Alina Sorgner, 2016. "Worker Personality: Another Skill Bias beyond Education in the Digital Age," Jena Economic Research Papers 2016-020, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena.
    9. Gregory, Terry & Salomons, Anna & Zierahn, Ulrich, 2016. "Racing With or Against the Machine? Evidence from Europe," Annual Conference 2016 (Augsburg): Demographic Change 145843, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    10. Guido Baldi & Patrick Harms, 2015. "Productivity Growth, Investment, and Secular Stagnation," DIW Roundup: Politik im Fokus 83, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    11. W. Erwin Diewert & Kevin J. Fox, 2017. "Decomposing Value Added Growth into Explanatory Factors," Discussion Papers 2017-02, School of Economics, The University of New South Wales.
    12. Kevin Hjortshøj O'Rourke, 2015. "Economic Impossibilities for our Grandchildren?," NBER Working Papers 21807, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    13. Stanley Fischer, 2016. "Reflections on Macroeconomics Then and Now," Business Economics, Palgrave Macmillan;National Association for Business Economics, vol. 51(3), pages 133-141, July.
    14. Jeff Borland & Michael Coelli, 2017. "Are Robots Taking Our Jobs?," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 50(4), pages 377-397, December.
    15. Guido Baldi & Patrick Harms, 2017. "The Natural Rate of Interest and Secular Stagnation," DIW Roundup: Politik im Fokus 110, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    16. G. Cette & R. Lecat & C. Ly-Marin, 2017. "Long-term growth and productivity projections in advanced countries," Working papers 617, Banque de France.
    17. Steven Ruggles, 2015. "Patriarchy, Power, and Pay: The Transformation of American Families, 1800–2015," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 52(6), pages 1797-1823, December.
    18. Komlos John, 2016. "Has Creative Destruction become more Destructive?," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 16(4), pages 1-12, October.
    19. Gilbert CETTE, 2015. "Which Role for ICTs as a Productivity Driver Over the Last Years and the Next Future?," Communications & Strategies, IDATE, Com&Strat dept., vol. 1(100), pages 65-83, 4th quart.
    20. Masayuki Morikawa, 2017. "Firms' Expectations About The Impact Of Ai And Robotics: Evidence From A Survey," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 55(2), pages 1054-1063, April.
    21. Sunil Mani, 2018. "Robot Apocalypse Does it Matter for India’s Manufacturing Industry?," Working Papers id:12378, eSocialSciences.
    22. Kovács, Olivér, 2017. "Az ipar 4.0 komplexitása - II
      [The Complexity of Industry 4.0 - Part 2]
      ," Közgazdasági Szemle (Economic Review - monthly of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences), Közgazdasági Szemle Alapítvány (Economic Review Foundation), vol. 0(9), pages 970-987.
    23. Fernald, John G., 2016. "Reassessing Longer-Run U.S. Growth: How Low?," Working Paper Series 2016-18, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.
    24. Cortes, Guido Matias & Salvatori, Andrea, 2016. "Delving into the Demand Side: Changes in Workplace Specialization and Job Polarization," IZA Discussion Papers 10120, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    25. Archibugi, Daniele, 2017. "The social imagination needed for an innovation-led recovery," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 46(3), pages 554-556.
    26. Guido Baldi & Patrick Harms, 2015. "Produktivitätswachstum, Investitionen und säkulare Stagnation," DIW Roundup: Politik im Fokus 83, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    27. MORIKAWA Masayuki, 2016. "The Effects of Artificial Intelligence and Robotics on Business and Employment: Evidence from a survey on Japanese firms," Discussion papers 16066, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
    28. K.V. Ramaswamy, 2018. "Technological change, automation and employment: A Short review of theory and evidence," Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai Working Papers 2018-002, Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai, India.
    29. Aristotelis Boukouras, 2016. "Capitalist Spirit and the Markets: Why Income Inequality Matters," Discussion Papers in Economics 16/16, Department of Economics, University of Leicester.
    30. Lichtblau, Karl & Bähr, Cornelius & Millack, Agnes & van Baal, Sebastian & aus dem Moore, Nils & Korfhage, Thorben, 2015. "Zukunft von Wirtschaft und Gesellschaft unter Minimalwachstumsbedingungen: Begründungsmuster, Folgen, Handlungsoptionen," RWI Projektberichte, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, number 123324.
    31. MIYAKAWA Daisuke & MIYAUCHI Yuhei & Christian PEREZ, 2017. "Who Are Afraid of Losing Their Jobs to Artificial Intelligence and Robots? Evidence from a survey," Discussion papers 17069, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
    32. Daniele Archibugi & Bengt-Åke Lundvall & Edward Steinmueller, 2016. "Science Fiction and Economic Cycles. A Dialogue on Technological Expectations," Management Working Papers 12, Birkbeck Department of Management, revised Nov 2016.
    33. Inklaar, Robert & Diewert, W. Erwin, 2016. "Measuring industry productivity and cross-country convergence," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 191(2), pages 426-433.
    34. Daniele Archibugi & Bengt-Ã…ke Lundvall & Edward Steinmueller, 2016. "(English) Science Fiction and Economic Cycles. A Dialogue on Technological Expectations (Italiano) Fantascienza e cicli economici. Un dialogo sulle aspettative tecnologiche," IRPPS Working Papers 90:2016, National Research Council, Institute for Research on Population and Social Policies.
    35. Caprettini, Bruno & Voth, Hans-Joachim, 2017. "Rage Against the Machines: Labour-Saving Technology and Unrest in England, 1830-32," CEPR Discussion Papers 11800, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    36. Diewert, Erwin & Inklaar, Robert, 2015. "Measuring Industry Productivity Across Time and Space and Cross Country Convergence," Economics working papers erwin_diewert-2015-20, Vancouver School of Economics, revised 02 Nov 2015.

  3. Vickers, Chris & Ziebarth, Nicolas L., 2014. "Did the National Industrial Recovery Act Foster Collusion? Evidence from the Macaroni Industry," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 74(03), pages 831-862, September.

    Cited by:

    1. Price V. Fishback, 2016. "How Successful Was the New Deal? The Microeconomic Impact of New Deal Spending and Lending Policies in the 1930s," NBER Working Papers 21925, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Nikolaus Fink & Philipp Schmidt-Dengler & Konrad Stahl & Christine Zulehner, 2017. "Registered cartels in Austria: an overview," European Journal of Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 44(3), pages 385-422, December.
    3. Nicolas L. Ziebarth, 2013. "Identifying the Effects of Bank Failures from a Natural Experiment in Mississippi during the Great Depression," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 5(1), pages 81-101, January.

  4. Chicu, Mark & Vickers, Chris & Ziebarth, Nicolas L., 2013. "Cementing the case for collusion under the National Recovery Administration," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 50(4), pages 487-507.

    Cited by:

    1. Price V. Fishback, 2016. "How Successful Was the New Deal? The Microeconomic Impact of New Deal Spending and Lending Policies in the 1930s," NBER Working Papers 21925, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Nikolaus Fink & Philipp Schmidt-Dengler & Konrad Stahl & Christine Zulehner, 2017. "Registered cartels in Austria: an overview," European Journal of Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 44(3), pages 385-422, December.
    3. Miguel Morin, 2015. "The Labor Market Consequences of Electricity Adoption: Concrete Evidence from the Great Depression," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1554, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    4. Nicolas L. Ziebarth, 2013. "Identifying the Effects of Bank Failures from a Natural Experiment in Mississippi during the Great Depression," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 5(1), pages 81-101, January.
    5. Taylor, Jason E. & Neumann, Todd C., 2016. "Recovery Spring, Faltering Fall: March to November 1933," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 54-67.

Chapters

  1. Mark Chicu & Chris Vickers & Nicolas L. Ziebarth, 2012. "Cementing the Case for Collusion under the National Recovery Administration," NBER Chapters,in: The Microeconomics of New Deal Policy National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    See citations under working paper version above.Sorry, no citations of chapters recorded.

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