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Ken Housinger

Personal Details

First Name:Ken
Middle Name:
Last Name:Housinger
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RePEc Short-ID:pho626
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]

Affiliation

(50%) Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago

Chicago, Illinois (United States)
http://www.chicagofed.org/
RePEc:edi:frbchus (more details at EDIRC)

(50%) Economic Research Department
Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago

Chicago, Illinois (United States)
https://www.chicagofed.org/research/index
RePEc:edi:rfrbcus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

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Jump to: Articles

Articles

  1. Daniel Aaronson & Kenneth Housinger, 1999. "The impact of technology on displacement and reemployment," Economic Perspectives, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, vol. 23(Q II), pages 14-30.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Articles

  1. Daniel Aaronson & Kenneth Housinger, 1999. "The impact of technology on displacement and reemployment," Economic Perspectives, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, vol. 23(Q II), pages 14-30.

    Cited by:

    1. Edward N. Wolff, 2005. "Computerization and Rising Unemployment Duration," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 31(4), pages 507-536, Fall.
    2. Mateos-Planas, Xavier, 2004. "Technology adoption with finite horizons," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 28(11), pages 2129-2154, October.
    3. Younghwan Song, 2009. "Training, Technological Changes, and Displacement," Journal of Labor Research, Springer, vol. 30(3), pages 201-218, September.
    4. Daniel Rodriguez & Madeline Zavodny, 2000. "Explaining changes in the age distribution of displaced workers," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2000-1, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
    5. Piekkola, Hannu & Böckerman, Petri, 2002. "On Whom Falls the Burden of Restructuring? Evidence from Finland," Discussion Papers 714, The Research Institute of the Finnish Economy.
    6. Steven A. Sass & Kelly Haverstick & Jean-Pierre Aubry, 2009. "Employers' (Lack of) Response to the Retirement Income Challenge," Issues in Brief ib2009-9-13, Center for Retirement Research, revised Jun 2009.
    7. Madeline Zavodny, 2000. "Technology and job retention among young adults, 1980-98," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2000-7, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
    8. William J. Carrington, 2015. "Do We Know Why Earnings Fall with Job Displacement? Working Paper: 2015-01," Working Papers 49908, Congressional Budget Office.
    9. William J. Carrington & Bruce Fallick, 2014. "Why Do Earnings Fall with Job Displacement?," Working Papers (Old Series) 1405, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
    10. Daniel Rodriguez & Madeline Zavodny, 2000. "Are displaced workers now finished at age forty?," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, vol. 85(Q2), pages 33-48.
    11. Alicia H. Munnell & Steven Sass & Mauricio Soto & Natalia Zhivan, 2006. "Has the Displacement of Older Workers Increased?," Working Papers, Center for Retirement Research at Boston College wp2006-17, Center for Retirement Research, revised Sep 2006.

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