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Géraldine Duthé
(Geraldine Duthe)

Personal Details

First Name:Geraldine
Middle Name:
Last Name:Duthe
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pdu323
http://www.ined.fr/fr/recherche/chercheurs/Duth%C3%A9+G%C3%A9raldine

Affiliation

Institut National d'Études Démographiques (INED)

Paris, France
http://www.ined.fr/
RePEc:edi:ineddfr (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Articles

Articles

  1. Géraldine Duthé & France Meslé & Jacques Vallin & Irina Badurashvili & Karine Kuyumjyan, 2012. "High Sex Ratios at Birth in the Caucasus: Modern Technology to Satisfy Old Desires," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 38(3), pages 487-501, September.
  2. Géraldine Duthé & Irina Badurashvili & Karine Kuyumjyan & France Meslé & Jacques Vallin, 2010. "Mortality in the Caucasus," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 22(23), pages 691-732.
  3. Géraldine Duthé, 2008. "Recrudescence du paludisme au Sénégal : la mesure de la mortalité palustre à Mlomp," Population (french edition), Institut National d'Études Démographiques (INED), vol. 63(3), pages 505-530.
  4. Géraldine Duthé & Gilles Pison, 2008. "Adult mortality in a rural area of Senegal," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 19(37), pages 1419-1434.
  5. Géraldine Duthé, 2005. "Mortalité, santé : moteurs du progrès, facteurs des inégalités," Population (french edition), Institut National d'Études Démographiques (INED), vol. 60(3), pages 367-390.

Citations

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Articles

  1. Géraldine Duthé & France Meslé & Jacques Vallin & Irina Badurashvili & Karine Kuyumjyan, 2012. "High Sex Ratios at Birth in the Caucasus: Modern Technology to Satisfy Old Desires," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 38(3), pages 487-501, September.

    Cited by:

    1. Tamar Khitarishvili, 2016. "Gender Dimensions of Inequality in the Countries of Central Asia, South Caucasus, and Western CIS," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_858, Levy Economics Institute.
    2. Chao, Fengqing & Wazir, Muhammad Asif & Ombao, Hernando, 2021. "Levels and trends in sex ratio at birth in provinces of Pakistan from 1980 to 2020 with scenario-based missing female birth projections to 2050: a Bayesian modeling approach," SocArXiv 5n3y8, Center for Open Science.
    3. Valentine Becquet & Nicolás Sacco & Ignacio Pardo, 2022. "Disparities in Gender Preference and Fertility: Southeast Asia and Latin America in a Comparative Perspective," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 41(3), pages 1295-1323, June.
    4. Lee, Soohyung & Orsini, Chiara, 2018. "Girls and Boys: Economic Crisis, Fertility, and Birth Outcomes," IZA Discussion Papers 11531, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    5. Chao, Fengqing & Gerland, Patrick & Cook, Alex R. & Guilmoto, Christophe Z. & Alkema, Leontine, 2021. "Projecting sex imbalances at birth at global, regional, and national levels from 2018 to 2100: scenario-based Bayesian probabilistic projections of the sex ratio at birth and missing female births," SocArXiv zps2m, Center for Open Science.
    6. Sam Hyun Yoo & Sarah R. Hayford & Victor Agadjanian, 2017. "Old Habits Die Hard? Lingering Son Preference in an Era of Normalizing Sex Ratios at Birth in South Korea," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 36(1), pages 25-54, February.
    7. Ridhi Kashyap & Francisco Villavicencio, 2016. "The Dynamics of Son Preference, Technology Diffusion, and Fertility Decline Underlying Distorted Sex Ratios at Birth: A Simulation Approach," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 53(5), pages 1261-1281, October.
    8. Sara Tafuro, 2020. "An Economic Framework for Persisting Son Preference: Rethinking the Role of Intergenerational Support," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 39(6), pages 983-1007, December.
    9. Orsola Torrisi, 2020. "Armed Conflict and the Timing of Childbearing in Azerbaijan," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 46(3), pages 501-556, September.
    10. Soohyung Lee & Chiara Orsini, 2018. "Girls and boys: Economic crisis, fertility, and birth outcomes," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 33(7), pages 1044-1063, November.

  2. Géraldine Duthé & Irina Badurashvili & Karine Kuyumjyan & France Meslé & Jacques Vallin, 2010. "Mortality in the Caucasus," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 22(23), pages 691-732.

    Cited by:

    1. France Meslé & Jacques Vallin, 2006. "Diverging Trends in Female Old‐Age Mortality: The United States and the Netherlands versus France and Japan," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 32(1), pages 123-145, March.

  3. Géraldine Duthé & Gilles Pison, 2008. "Adult mortality in a rural area of Senegal," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 19(37), pages 1419-1434.

    Cited by:

    1. Jamison, Dean T. & Murphy, Shane M. & Sandbu, Martin E., 2016. "Why has under-5 mortality decreased at such different rates in different countries?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 16-25.
    2. Ulrich Nguemdjo & Bruno Ventelou, 2020. "How do migrations affect under-five mortality in rural areas? Evidence from Niakhar, Senegal," AMSE Working Papers 2043, Aix-Marseille School of Economics, France.
    3. Emmanuelle Guyavarch & Gilles Pison & Géraldine Duthé & Adama Marra & Jean-Philippe Chippaux, 2010. "Mortality due to External Causes in Three Rural Areas of Senegal [La mortalité violente dans trois régions rurales du Sénégal]," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 26(4), pages 483-505, November.
    4. Stéphane Helleringer & Gilles Pison & Almamy Kanté & Géraldine Duthé & Armelle Andro, 2014. "Reporting Errors in Siblings’ Survival Histories and Their Impact on Adult Mortality Estimates: Results From a Record Linkage Study in Senegal," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 51(2), pages 387-411, April.
    5. Ulrich Nguemdjo & Bruno Ventelou, 2020. "How do migrations affect under-five mortality in rural areas? Evidence from Niakhar, Senegal," Working Papers halshs-03078776, HAL.
    6. Gilles Pison, 2005. "Population observatories as sources of information on mortality in developing countries," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 13(13), pages 301-334.

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